Hysteresis definition

hĭstə-rēsĭs
Frequency:
The lagging of an effect behind its cause, as when the change in magnetism of a body lags behind changes in the magnetic field.
noun
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(physics) A lag of effect when the forces acting on a body are changed, as a lag in magnetization (magnetic hysteresis) of a ferromagnetic substance when the magnetizing force is changed.
noun
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The dependence of the state of a system on the history of its state. For example, the magnetization of a material such as iron depends not only on the magnetic field it is exposed to but on previous exposures to magnetic fields. This “memory” of previous exposure to magnetism is the working principle in audio tape and hard disk devices. Deformations in the shape of substances that last after the deforming force has been removed, as well as phenomena such as supercooling , are examples of hysteresis.
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A property of a system such that an output value is not a strict function of the corresponding input, but also incorporates some lag, delay, or history dependence, and in particular when the response for a decrease in the input variable is different from the response for an increase. For example, a thermostat with a nominal setpoint of 75° might switch the controlled heat source on when the temperature drops below 74°, and off when it rises above 76°.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
hysteresis
Plural:
hystereses

Origin of hysteresis

  • Greek husterēsis a shortcoming from husterein to come late from husteros late ud- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Coined by Sir James Alfred Ewing from Ancient Greek ὑστέρησις (husterēsis, “shortcoming”), from ὑστερέω (hustereō, “I am late, fall short”), from ὕστερος (husteros, “later”).

    From Wiktionary