Gerundive meaning

jə-rŭndĭv
A verbal adjective in Latin that in the nominative case expresses the notion of fitness or obligation and in other cases functions as a future passive participle.
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In Latin, a verbal adjective with a typical gerund stem form, used as a future passive participle expressing duty, necessity, fitness, etc. (Ex.: delenda in delenda est Carthago, “Carthage must be destroyed”)
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In other languages, any of various forms analogous to this.
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(in Latin grammar) A verbal adjective that describes obligation or necessity, equivalent in form to the future passive participle.
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(less commonly, in English grammar) A verbal adjective ending in -ing.
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Origin of gerundive

  • Middle English gerundif from Late Latin gerundīvus from gerundium gerund gerund

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin gerundīvus (“of a gerund”), from gerundium (“gerund”), from gerundus (“which is to be carried out”), future passive participle (gerundive) of gerō (“carry, bear”).

    From Wiktionary