Participle meaning

pärtĭ-sĭpəl
Frequency:
(gram.) A verbal form having some characteristics and functions of both verb and adjective: in English, the present participle ends in -ing (asking) and the past participle most commonly ends in -ed or -en (asked, spoken)
noun
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7
In grammar terms, a participle is an adjective (descriptive word) made from a verb.

An example of a participle is "sleeping" in the phrase "sleeping dogs."

noun
13
6
A form of a verb that in some languages, such as English, can function independently as an adjective, as the past participle baked in We had some baked beans, and is used with an auxiliary verb to indicate tense, aspect, or voice, as the past participle baked in the passive sentence The beans were baked too long.
noun
12
6
(grammar) A form of a verb that may function as an adjective or noun. English has two types of participles: the present participle and the past participle.
noun
8
5
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Origin of participle

  • Middle English from Old French variant of participe from Latin participium (translation of Greek metokhē sharing, partaking, participle) from particeps particip- partaker participate

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French participle (1388), "˜a noun-adjective', variant of participe, from Latin participium.

    From Wiktionary