Garage meaning

gə-räzh, -räj
A closed shelter for a motor vehicle or vehicles.
noun
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A business establishment where motor vehicles are stored, repaired, serviced, etc.
noun
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Designating or of a kind of loud, fast rock music originating in the U.S. in the 1960s, characterized by crude instrumental and vocal techniques associated with young, amateur musicians.
adjective
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Designating or of a band that plays such music.
adjective
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A building (section of a building) used to store a car or cars, tools and other miscellaneous items.
noun
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(chiefly UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand) A place where cars are serviced and repaired.
noun
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To put or keep in a garage.
verb
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(chiefly UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand) A petrol filling station.
noun
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(dated, 20th century, North America) An independent automobile repair shop.
noun
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A type of guitar rock music, personified by amateur bands playing in the basement or garage.
noun
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(UK) A type of electronic dance music related to house music, with warped and time-stretched sounds.
noun
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To store in a garage.

We garaged the convertible during the monsoon months.

verb
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The definition of a garage is an enclosed space for keeping or repairing cars.

An example of a garage is the part of a home that has a large door that opens to the outside.

An example of a garage is the place where you take your car for an oil change.

noun
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A building or indoor space in which to park or keep a motor vehicle.
noun
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A commercial establishment where cars are repaired, serviced, or parked.
noun
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To put or store in a garage.
verb
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Origin of garage

  • French from garer to shelter from Old French garer, guerrer of Germanic origin wer-4 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Borrowing from French garage (“keeping under cover, protection, shelter”), derivative of French garer (“to keep under cover, dock, shunt, guard, keep”), from Middle French garer, garrer, guerrer; partly from Old French garir, warir (from Old Frankish *warjan); and partly from Old French varer (“to fight, defend oneself, protect”), from Old Norse varask (“to defend oneself”), reflexive of vara (“to ware, watch out, defend”); both ultimately from Proto-Germanic *warjaną (“to defend, ward off”), *warōną (“to watch, protect”), from Proto-Indo-European *wer- (“to close, cover, protect, save, defend”).

    From Wiktionary