Funeral meaning

fyo͝onər-əl
Frequency:
The definition of a funeral is a ceremony celebrating or honoring the dead.

An example of a funeral is when your grandfather dies and you invite everyone to come to the church to hear speeches about him and to say goodbye.

noun
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An end or a cessation of existence.
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(slang) A source of concern or care.

If he doesn't meet the deadline, it's his funeral.

noun
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Of, relating to, or resembling a funeral.
adjective
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Of or having to do with a funeral.
adjective
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The burial procession accompanying a body to the grave.
noun
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The sequence of rituals and ceremonies connected with the burial or cremation of a dead person.
noun
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The procession accompanying the body to the place of burial or cremation.
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Related to a ceremony in honor of a deceased person.
adjective
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A ceremony to honour and remember a deceased person.

No one likes to go to funerals.

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(dated, chiefly in the plural) A funeral sermon.
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be someone's funeral
  • to be someone's problem, worry, etc. and not another's
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

be someone's funeral

Origin of funeral

  • Middle English funerelles funeral rites from Old French funerailles from Medieval Latin fūnerālia neuter pl. of fūnerālis funereal from Late Latin from Latin fūnus fūner- death rites dheuə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • 1437, from Middle French funerailles (“funeral rites”) plural, from Medieval Latin funeralia (“funeral rites”), originally neuter plural of Late Latin funeralis (“having to do with a funeral”), from Latin funere, ablative of funus (“funeral, death, corpse”), origin unknown, perhaps ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dʰew- (“to die”). Singular and plural used interchangeably in English until circa 1700. The adjective funereal is first attested 1725, by influence of Middle French funerail, from Latin funereus, from funus.

    From Wiktionary