Folly definition

fŏlē
Frequency:
Any foolish action or belief.
noun
16
3
Lack of good sense, understanding, or foresight.

An act of folly.

noun
9
2
A lack of understanding, sense, or rational conduct; foolishness.
noun
5
0
Action that ends or can end in disaster.
noun
5
0
An act or instance of foolishness.

Regretted the follies of his youth.

noun
3
0
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An elaborate theatrical revue consisting of music, dance, and skits.
noun
7
6
A costly undertaking having an absurd or ruinous outcome.
noun
1
0
Any foolish and useless but expensive undertaking.
noun
1
0
An unconventional or extravagant, and often largely purposeless, building or structure.
noun
1
0

This is a war of folly.

noun
1
0
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Thoughtless action resulting in tragic consequence.

The purchase of Alaska from Russia was termed Seward's folly.

noun
1
0
Folly is defined as an act of foolishness or a lack of good sense.

An example of folly is someone intentionally stabbing their foot with a pitch fork.

An example of folly is building a hospital on an earthquake fault line.

noun
1
1
A structure, such as a pavilion in a garden, that is chiefly decorative rather than practical in purpose.
noun
0
0
(obs.) Wickedness or evil; also, lewdness.
noun
0
0
A fanciful building built for purely ornamental reasons.

A luncheonette in the shape of a coffee cup is particularly conspicuous, as is intended of an architectural duck or folly.

noun
0
0
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
folly
Plural:
follies

Origin of folly

  • Middle English folie from Old French from fol foolish from Late Latin follis windbag, fool fool

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French folie (“madness”), from the adjective fol (“mad, insane”).

    From Wiktionary