Flabbergast meaning

flăbər-găst
To overwhelm with bewilderment; to stun, confound or amaze, especially with ludicrous affect.

He was flabbergasted to find that his work had been done for him before he began.

Her stupidity flabbergasts me, and I have to force myself to keep a straight face while she explains her beliefs.

I love to flabbergast the little-minded by shattering their preconceptions about my nationality and gender.

The oddity of the situation was so flabbergasting I couldn't react in time for anyone to see it.

verb
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(uncountable) Overwhelming surprise, confusion or shock.

When I saw my house on fire, the flabbergast overcame me and I just stood and stared, too shocked to comprehend what I was seeing.

His flabbergast was so great he couldn't even come up with a plausible answer.

noun
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To make speechless with amazement; astonish.
verb
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To cause to be overcome with astonishment; astound.
verb
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(countable) An awkward person.
noun
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To flabbergast is defined as to cause great surprise or amazement.

When you make a very surprising announcement that leaves all others stunned, this is an example of a situation where you flabbergast the listeners.

verb
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Origin of flabbergast

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin uncertain. Hotten says it is from Old English; Whitney and Smith suggests flabby or flap (strike) + gast (astonish); The Imperial Dictionary connects it with flabber (related to flap, to strike) + the root of aghast, and notes that flabagast may have been the root (to strike aghast); first documented as slang in 1772; Cassell gives it as dialectical from Suffolk, from flap or flabby + aghast, possibly related to Scottish flabrigast (to boast) or flabrigastit (worn out with exertion); Smith relates it to flab (to quake) or flap (to make a flap over something) + Middle English agasten (to terrify), and relates it to aghast, ghastly and ghost

    From Wiktionary