Farm meaning

färm
To grow (a particular crop).
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The definition of a farm is a place where crops are grown or animals are raised, or a piece of land leased by the government to earn tax money.

An example of a farm is a place where dairy cows are raised.

An example of a farm is a place where baby fish are raised; a fish farm.

noun
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A district of a country leased out by a government for the collection of taxes.
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To cultivate or produce a crop on (land).
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To work on or operate a farm; raise crops or animals on a farm.
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(baseball) A minor-league club affiliated with a major-league club for the training of recruits and the maintenance of temporarily unneeded players.
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To cultivate, breed, or raise (plants or animals).
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To pay a fixed sum in order to have the right to collect and retain profits from (a business, for example).
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To turn over (a business, for example) to another in return for the payment of a fixed sum.
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A piece of land (with house, barns, etc.) on which crops or animals are raised: orig., such land let out to tenants.
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Any place where certain things are raised.

A tract of water for raising fish is a fish farm.

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(sports) A minor-league team, esp. a baseball team, having an agreement with a major-league team to train its young or inexperienced players.
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To cultivate (land)
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To cultivate or rear (plants or animals) on a farm.
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To collect the taxes and other fees of (a business) on a commission basis or for a fixed amount.
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To turn over to another for a fee.
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1700, J. Tyrrell, Gen. Hist. Eng. II. 814.

All..Tythings shall stand at the old Farm, without any Increase.

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1767, W. Blackstone, Comm. Laws Eng. II. 320.

The most usual and customary feorm or rent..must be reserved yearly on such lease.

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(historical) A fixed yearly sum accepted from a person as a composition for taxes or other moneys which he is empowered to collect; also, a fixed charge imposed on a town, county, etc., in respect of a tax or taxes to be collected within its limits.
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(historical) The letting-out of public revenue to a ‘farmer’; the privilege of farming a tax or taxes.
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The condition of being let at a fixed rent; lease; a lease.
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A tract of land held on lease for the purpose of cultivation.
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A place where agricultural and similar activities take place, especially the growing of crops or the raising of livestock.
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(usually in combination) A location used for an industrial purpose, having many similar structures.

Fuel farm; wind farm; antenna farm.

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(computing) A group of coordinated servers.

A render farm; a server farm.

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(intransitive) To work on a farm, especially in the growing and harvesting of crops.
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To devote (land) to farming.
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To give up to another, as an estate, a business, the revenue, etc., on condition of receiving in return a percentage of what it yields; to farm out.

To farm the taxes.

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(video games, chiefly online gaming) To engage in grinding (repetitive activity) in a particular area or against specific enemies for a particular drop or item.
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Farm is defined as to grow crops or raise animals.

An example of farm is to raise, milk and take care of dairy cows.

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A tract of land cultivated for the purpose of agricultural production.
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To engage in farming.
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The body of farmers of public revenues.
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farm out
  • to rent (land, a business, etc.) in return for a fixed payment
  • to send (work) from a shop, office, etc. to workers on the outside
  • to let out the labor of (a convict, etc.) for a fixed amount
  • to destroy the fertility of (land), as by failing to rotate crops
  • to assign to a farm
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of farm

  • Middle English lease, leased property from Old French ferme from Medieval Latin firma fixed payment from Latin firmāre to establish from firmus firm dher- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English ferme, farme (“rent, revenue, produce, factor, stewardship, meal, feast”), from Anglo-Norman ferme (“rent, lease, farm”), from Medieval Latin ferma, firma), from Old English feorm, fearm, farm (“provision, food, supplies, provisions supplied by a tenant or vassal to his lord, rent, possessions, stores, feast, entertainment, haven”), from Proto-Germanic *fermō (“means of living, subsistence”), from Proto-Germanic *ferhwō, *ferhuz (“life force, body, being”), from Proto-Indo-European *perkʷ- (“life, force, strength, tree”). Cognate with Scots ferm (“rent, farm”). Related also to Old English feorh (“life, spirit”), German Ferch (“life, blood”), Icelandic fjör (“life, vitality, vigour, animation”), Gothic (fairƕus, “the world”). Compare also Old English feormehām (“farm”), feormere (“purveyor, grocer”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Old English feorm is the origin of Medieval Latin ferma, firma (“farm", also "feast”) (whence also Old French ferme, Occitan ferma), instead of the historically assumed derivation from unrelated Latin firma (“firm, solid”), which shares the same form. The sense of "rent, fixed payment", which was already present in the Old English word, may have been further strengthened due to resemblance to Latin firmitas (“security, surety”). Additionally, Old French ferme continued to shape the development of the English word throughout the Middle English period .

    From Wiktionary