Oyster meaning

oi'stər
The definition of an oyster is a bivalve mollusk with an irregular long shell that is normally attached to rocks and that is consumed as food.

A bivalve mollusk that is taken from the ocean and served raw as part of a seafood buffet is an example of an oyster.

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A close-mouthed person.
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An edible bit of muscle found in the hollow of the pelvic bone of a fowl.
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To gather, dredge for, or raise oysters.
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Any of various bivalve mollusks with an irregularly shaped, unequal shell, living attached to rocks, other shells, etc., and widely used as food.
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The soft, edible part of such a mollusk.
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The oyster-shaped bit of meat contained in a depression on each side of the pelvic bone of a fowl.
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Something from which profit or advantage can be extracted.

The world is my oyster.

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A taciturn person.
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To gather, raise, or dredge oysters.
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Any of several edible bivalve mollusks of the family Ostreidae, having a rough, irregularly shaped shell attached to the substrate in shallow marine waters. Oysters are widely cultivated for food.
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Any of various similar or related bivalve mollusks, such as the pearl oyster.
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Any marine bivalve mollusk of the Family Ostreidae, usually found adhering to rocks or other fixed objects in shallow water along the seacoasts, or in brackish water in the mouth of rivers.
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The delicate morsel of dark meat contained in a small cavity of the bone on each side of the lower part of the back of a fowl.
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A pale beige color tinted with grey or pink, like that of an oyster.

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(colloquial, by analogy) A person who keeps secrets and private information to him- or herself.
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Of a pale beige colour tinted with grey or pink, like that of an oyster.
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(intransitive) To fish for oysters.
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Origin of oyster

  • Middle English oistre from Old French from Latin ostreum, ostrea from Greek ostreon ost- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Old English ostre, from Latin ostrea; reinforced or superseded in Middle English by Anglo-Norman oistre, from Old French oistre, uistre (modern French huître), also from Latin ostrea, from Ancient Greek ὄστρεον (ostreon).
    From Wiktionary