Mollusk meaning

mŏl'əsk
Any of numerous chiefly marine invertebrates of the phylum Mollusca, typically having a soft unsegmented body, a mantle, and a protective calcareous shell, and including the snails, clams, and squids.
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Any of a large phylum (Mollusca) of invertebrate animals, including the chitons, gastropods, cephalopods, scaphopods, and bivalves characterized by a soft, unsegmented body, typically enclosed wholly or in part in a mantle and a calcareous shell, and usually having gills and a foot.
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Any of numerous chiefly marine invertebrates of the phylum Mollusca, typically having a soft unsegmented body, a mantle, and a protective calcareous shell, and including the snails, clams, and squids.
noun
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Any of numerous invertebrate animals of the phylum Mollusca, usually living in water and often having a hard outer shell. They have a muscular foot, a well-developed circulatory and nervous system, and often complex eyes. Mollusks include gastropods (snails and shellfish), slugs, octopuses, squids, and the extinct ammonites. Mollusks appear in the fossil record in the early Cambrian Period, but it is not known from what group they evolved.
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(US) Alternative spelling of mollusc.
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Origin of mollusk

  • French mollusque from New Latin Mollusca phylum name from neuter pl. of Latin molluscus thin-shelled from mollis soft mel-1 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition