England meaning

ĭngglənd
A division of the United Kingdom, in the southern part of the island of Great Britain. Inhabited in prehistoric times by Celtic peoples, it was subsequently invaded by Romans, Angles, Saxons, Jutes, Danes, and Normans. Acts of union joined England with Wales in 1536, with Scotland in 1707 to create the political entity of Great Britain, and with Ireland in 1801 to form the United Kingdom. London is the historic capital and the largest city.
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(place) Division of the United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland, occupying most of the S half of the island of Great Britain: 50,637 sq mi (131,149 sq km); cap. London.
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(place) England & Wales, considered an administrative unit.
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The region of the island of Great Britain which is to the east of Wales and the south of Scotland; one of the constituent countries of the United Kingdom.
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A habitational surname​.
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Origin of england

  • ME Englonde, Yngelonde (with vowel change as in wing < ME weng) < OE Engla land, lit., land of the Angles (as opposed to the Saxons), hence England: see Angle

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English Engeland, Englelond, from Old English Englaland (“land of the Angles”), from genitive of Engle (“the Angles”) + land (“land”).

    From Wiktionary