Diversion meaning

dĭ-vûrzhən, dī-
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The definition of a diversion is an activity, often pleasant, that takes you away from your normal activity, or a detour or alternative course.

An interruption from a friend in the middle of doing tedious work is an example of a diversion.

When money is taken from education funds and instead put into funds for seniors, this is an example of a diversion of resources.

When a road is closed and traffic is rerouted, this is an example of a diversion.

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Something that distracts the mind and relaxes or entertains.
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The act or an instance of diverting or turning aside; deviation.
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A maneuver that draws the attention of an opponent away from a planned point of action, especially as part of military strategy.
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A policy or practice permitting a juvenile to be removed from traditional processing in juvenile court and placed in a program involving an alternative disposition, such as treatment or rehabilitation services.
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A diverting or turning aside.

Diversion of funds from the treasury.

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Distraction of attention.

Diversion of the enemy.

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Anything that diverts or distracts the attention; specif., a pastime or amusement.
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(military) A tactic used to draw attention away from the real threat or action.
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A hobby; an activity that distracts the mind.
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The act of diverting.
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Removal of water via a canal.
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(transport) A detour, such as during road construction.
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(transport) The rerouting of cargo or passengers to a new transshipment point or destination, or to a different mode of transportation before arrival at the ultimate destination.
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(law) Officially halting or suspending a formal criminal or juvenile justice proceeding and referral of the accused person to a treatment or care program.
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Origin of diversion

  • Late Latin dīversiō dīversiōn- act of turning aside from Latin dīversus past participle of dīvertere to divert divert

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French diversion, from Medieval Latin diversio, from Latin divertere, past participle diversus (“to divert”); see divert.

    From Wiktionary