Dike meaning

dīk
(geology) A long mass of igneous rock that cuts across the structure of adjacent rock.
noun
4
0
A barrier blocking a passage, especially for protection.
noun
3
0
A raised causeway.
noun
3
0
A ditch; a channel.
noun
3
0
To protect, enclose, or provide with a dike.
verb
3
0
Advertisement
To drain with dikes or ditches.
verb
1
0
An embankment or dam made to prevent flooding by the sea or by a river.
noun
1
0
A protective barrier or obstacle.
noun
1
0
(scot.) A low dividing wall of earth or stone.
noun
1
0
(archaic) A raised causeway.
noun
1
0
Advertisement
(pejorative) A lesbian, especially a manly or unattractive lesbian.
noun
1
0
(geol.) Igneous rock that solidified as a tabular body in a more or less vertical fissure.
noun
0
0
To provide, protect, or enclose with a dike or dikes.
verb
0
0
To drain by a ditch.
verb
0
0
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A body of igneous rock that cuts across the structure of adjoining rock, usually as a result of the intrusion of magma. Dikes are often of a different composition from the rock they cut across. They are usually on the order of centimeters to meters across and up to tens of kilometers long.
0
0
An embankment of earth and rock built to prevent floods or to hold irrigation water in for agricultural purposes.
0
0
(UK) Archaic spelling of all (UK) meanings of dyke.
noun
0
0
A barrier of stone or earth used to hold back water and prevent flooding.
noun
0
0
(geology) A body of once molten igneous rock that was injected into older rocks in a manner that crosses bedding planes.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To surround or protect with a dike or dry bank; to secure with a bank.
verb
0
0
To drain by a dike or ditch.
verb
0
0
A topographic surname​ for someone living near a dike.
pronoun
0
0
(Greek mythology) The goddess/personification of justice, order and judgement and one of the Horae. She is a daughter of Zeus and Themis, and her sisters are Eirene and Eunomia. Her Roman counterpart is Justitia/Iustitia.
pronoun
0
0
Alternative spelling of Dikê.
pronoun
0
0
Advertisement

Origin of dike

  • Middle English from Old English dīc trench dhīgw- in Indo-European roots and from Old Norse dīki ditch

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English (Northern) dik, dike, from Old Norse díki 'ditch, dike'. More at and doublet of ditch.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Ancient Greek Δίκη (Dikē, literally “Justice, Order, Judgement”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Ancient Greek Δίκη (Dikē).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English.

    From Wiktionary