Digital meaning

dĭjĭ-tl
The definition of digital is something that is or is like a finger.

An example of digital is a robotic finger.

adjective
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Expressed in discrete numerical form, especially for use by a computer or other electronic device.

Digital information.

adjective
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Performed with a finger.
adjective
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Of, like, or constituting a digit, esp. a finger.
adjective
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A format in which bits of data (information represented by 1s and 0s) are stored, transmitted, or manipulated. Each individual digit is a bit. Contrasts with analog format, in which data is transferred by amplifying the strength of the signal or varying its frequency in order to transmit information.
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Digital is defined as something relating to a device that transmits information by discrete numerics.

An example of digital is an mp3 player.

adjective
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Characterized by widespread use of computers.

Living in the digital age.

adjective
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A key played with the finger, as on a piano.
noun
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Having digits.
adjective
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Using numbers that are digits to represent all the variables involved in calculation.
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Using a row of digits, rather than numbers on a dial, to provide numerical information.

A digital watch, a digital thermometer.

adjective
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Representing or operating on data or information in numerical form. A digital clock uses a series of changing digits to represent time at discrete intervals, for example, every second. Modern computers rely on digital processing techniques, in which both data and the instructions for manipulating data are represented as binary numbers.
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(historical) Of or relating to computers or the Information Age.
adjective
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A finger.
noun
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(finance) A digital option.
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Using or giving a reading in digits.

A digital clock.

adjective
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Expressed in discrete numerical form, especially for use by a computer or other electronic device.

Digital information.

adjective
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Using or giving a reading in digits.

A digital clock.

adjective
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Relating to or resembling a digit, especially a finger.
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Having to do with digits (fingers or toes); performed with a finger.
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A key played with a finger, as on the piano.
noun
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(1) Data in binary form. See digital format and binary.
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Property of representing values as discrete numbers rather than a continuous spectrum.

Digital computer; digital clock.

adjective
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Relating to or being a profession or activity that is performed using digital devices.

A digital librarian; digital photography.

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Pertaining to the representation of data by means of digits, or discrete quantities such as numbers or signals that can be interpreted as numbers. By contrast, analog signals have meaning at all intermediate levels. In telecommunications, digital transmission systems make use of pulses or varying levels of electromagnetic energy, such as electricity, radio waves, or light. Digital communications originates in telegraphy, in which a mechanical key is used to close an electrical circuit for varying lengths of time to send a series of short pulses (dots) and long pulses (dashes) that, in specific combinations, represent specific characters or series of characters. Early mechanical computers used a similar concept for input and output. Contemporary computer systems communicate in binary mode through variations in electrical voltage. Digital signaling in a contemporary electrical transmission system involves a signal that varies in voltage to represent one of two discrete and well-defined states.Two of the simplest approaches are unipolar and bipolar signaling. Unipolar signaling makes use of a positive (+) voltage and a null, or zero (0), voltage. Bipolar signaling, makes use of a positive (+) or a negative (
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Origin of digital

  • From Latin digitālis, from digitus (“finger, toe”) + -alis (“-al”).

    From Wiktionary