Diamond meaning

dīə-mənd, dīmənd
Frequency:
A diamond is defined as a colorless, very hard, crystalline mineral made of pure carbon, or a figure with four equal sides with small angles on the top and bottom and wider angles on the sides.

An example of a diamond is a traditional stone in an engagement ring.

An example of a diamond is the baseball playing field, specifically where each of the four bases are placed.

An example of a diamond is the suit of playing cards with a red, squarish symbol.

noun
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The definition of diamond is set with a diamond, or marking a 60th or 75th year.

An example of diamond used as an adjective is diamond earrings.

An example of something diamond is a couple's 60th wedding anniversary.

adjective
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An extremely hard, highly refractive crystalline form of carbon that is usually colorless and is used as a gemstone and in abrasives, cutting tools, and other applications.
noun
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Diamond means to adorn with this mineral.

An example of diamond is to wear a lot of diamonds in rings, earrings and necklaces.

verb
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A piece of jewelry containing such a gemstone.
noun
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A gem or other piece cut from this mineral.
noun
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A female given name of modern usage, from the name of the gem.
pronoun
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To adorn with diamonds.
verb
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A rhombus, particularly when oriented so that one of its diagonals is vertical and the other is horizontal.
noun
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A usually colorless, crystalline mineral consisting of pure carbon, with nearly perfect cleavage and the greatest hardness of any substance: unflawed, transparent stones are cut into gems of great brilliance, and less perfect forms are used for cutting tools, abrasives, etc.
noun
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A gemstone made from this mineral.

The dozen loose diamonds sparkled in the light.

noun
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A ring containing a diamond.

What a beautiful engagement diamond.

noun
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A very pale blue color/colour.

noun
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Something that resembles a diamond.
noun
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(geometry) A rhombus, especially when oriented so that its longer axis is vertical.
noun
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(geometry) The polyiamond made up of two triangles.
noun
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(baseball) The entire field of play used in the game.
noun
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(baseball) The infield of a baseball field.

The teams met on the diamond.

noun
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(card games) A card of the diamonds suit.

I have only one diamond in my hand.

noun
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(printing, dated) A kind of type in English printing, the smallest except for brilliant.
noun
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Made of, or containing diamond, a diamond or diamonds.

He gave her diamond earrings.

adjective
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Of, relating to, or being a sixtieth anniversary.

Today is their diamond wedding anniversary.

adjective
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Of, relating to, or being a seventy-fifth anniversary.

Today is their diamond wedding anniversary.

adjective
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To adorn with or as if with diamonds.
verb
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Of or relating to a 60th or 75th anniversary.
adjective
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Of, like, or set with a diamond or diamonds.
adjective
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Marking or celebrating the 60th, or sometimes 75th, year.

A diamond jubilee.

adjective
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To adorn with or as with diamonds.
verb
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A form of pure carbon that occurs naturally as a clear, cubic crystal and is the hardest of all known minerals. It often occurs as octahedrons with rounded edges and curved surfaces. Diamond forms under conditions of extreme temperature and pressure and is most commonly found in volcanic breccias and in alluvial deposits. Poorly formed diamonds are used in abrasives and in industrial cutting tools.
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(uncountable) A glimmering glass-like mineral that is an allotrope of carbon in which each atom is surrounded by four others in the form of a tetrahedron.

The saw is coated with diamond.

noun
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diamond in the rough
  • One having exceptionally good qualities or the potential for greatness but lacking polish and refinement.
idiom
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diamond in the rough
  • a diamond in its natural state
  • a person or thing of fine quality but lacking polish
idiom
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Origin of diamond

  • Middle English diamaunt from Old French diamant from Medieval Latin diamās diamant- alteration of Latin adamās adamant

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French diamant, from Late Latin diamas, from Latin adamas, from Ancient Greek ἀδάμας (adamas, “diamond”).

    From Wiktionary