Dialectic Definition

dīə-lĕktĭk
dialectics
noun
dialectics
The art or practice of examining opinions or ideas logically, often by the method of question and answer, so as to determine their validity.
Webster's New World
Logical argumentation.
Webster's New World
The method of logic used by Hegel and adapted by Marx to observable social and economic processes: it is based on the principle that an idea or event (thesis) generates its opposite (antithesis), leading to a reconciliation of opposites (synthesis)
Webster's New World
The Marxian process of change through the conflict of opposing forces, whereby a given contradiction is characterized by a primary and a secondary aspect, the secondary succumbing to the primary, which is then transformed into an aspect of a new contradiction.
American Heritage
A method of argument or exposition that systematically weighs contradictory facts or ideas with a view to the resolution of their real or apparent contradictions.
American Heritage
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adjective
Webster's New World
Wiktionary
Synonyms:
dialectical
Antonyms:

Other Word Forms of Dialectic

Noun

Singular:
dialectic
Plural:
dialectics

Origin of Dialectic

  • From Old French dialectique, from Late Latin dialectica, from Ancient Greek διαλεκτική (dialektike, “the art of argument through interactive questioning and answering”), from διαλεκτικός (dialektikos, “competent debater”), from διαλέγομαι (dialegomai, “to participate in a dialogue”), from διά (dia, “through, across”) + λέγειν (legein, “to speak”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English dialetik from Old French dialetique from Latin dialectica logic from Greek dialektikē (tekhnē) (art) of debate feminine of dialektikos from dialektos speech, conversation dialect

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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