Clack definition

klăk
To chatter thoughtlessly or at length.
verb
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A clacking sound.

The clack of an old-fashioned typewriter.

noun
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To make an abrupt, sharp sound, as in the collision of two hard surfaces.
verb
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To cackle or cluck, as a hen.
verb
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To cause to make an abrupt, sharp sound.
verb
1
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Something that makes a clacking sound.
noun
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Thoughtless, prolonged talk; chatter.
noun
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To make a sudden, sharp sound, as by striking two hard substances together.
verb
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To talk fast, foolishly, etc.; chatter.
verb
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To cluck or cackle.
verb
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To cause to make a sudden, sharp sound.
verb
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A sudden, sharp sound.
noun
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A device that makes such sounds.
noun
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Chatter.
noun
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An abrupt, sharp sound, especially one made by two hard objects colliding repetitively; a clatter; in sound, midway between a click and a clunk.
noun
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Anything that causes a clacking noise, such as the clapper of a mill, or a clack valve.
noun
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noun
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(intransitive) To make a sudden, sharp noise, or succession of noises; to click.
verb
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To cause to make a sudden, sharp noise, or succession of noises; to click.
verb
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To chatter or babble; to utter rapidly without consideration.

verb
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(UK) To cut the sheep's mark off (wool), to make the wool weigh less and thus yield less duty.
verb
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
clack
Plural:
clacks

Origin of clack

  • Middle English clakken from Old Norse klaka of imitative origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English clacken, clakken, claken, from Old English *clacian ("to slap, clap, clack"; suggested by clacu (“din; harm, injury”)), from Proto-Germanic *klakōną (“to clap, chirp”), from Proto-Indo-European *glag- (“to make a noise, clap, twitter”), from Proto-Indo-European *gal- (“to roop, scream, shout”). Cognate with Scots clake, claik (“to utter cries", also "to bedaub, sully with a sticky substance”), Dutch klakken (“to clack, crack”), Low German klakken (“to slap on, daub”), Norwegian klakke (“to clack, strike, knock”), Icelandic klaka (“to twitter, chatter, wrangle, dispute”).

    From Wiktionary