Circular meaning

sûr'kyə-lər
Of or relating to a circle.
adjective
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Circular is defined as an advertisement that goes out to a lot of people.

An example of a circular is the Penny Saver.

noun
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The definition of circular is round or related to being round.

An example of something circular is a pizza pie.

adjective
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Using a premise to prove a conclusion that in turn is used to prove the premise.

A circular argument.

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A printed advertisement, directive, or notice intended for mass distribution.
noun
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Circuitous; roundabout.

Took a circular route to the office.

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Defining one word in terms of another that is itself defined in terms of the first word.
adjective
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Addressed or distributed to a large number of persons.
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In the shape of a circle; round.
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Relating to a circle.
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Moving in a circle or spiral.
adjective
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Roundabout; circuitous.
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Designating or of an invalid argument in which the conclusion that is to be proved is assumed in a premise.
adjective
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Intended for circulation among a number of people.
adjective
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An advertisement, letter, etc., usually prepared in quantities for extensive circulation.
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Of or relating to a circle.
adjective
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In the shape of, or moving in a circle.
adjective
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Referring back to itself, so as to prevent computation or comprehension; infinitely recursive.

Circular reasoning.

Your dictionary defines "brave" as "courageous", and "courageous" as "brave". That's a circular definition.

A circular formula in a spreadsheet.

adjective
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Distributed to a large number of persons.
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(archaic) Adhering to a fixed circle of legends; cyclic; hence, mean; inferior.
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In administration, a circular letter.
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(dated) A sleeveless cloak, cut in circular form.
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Origin of circular

  • Middle English circuler from Anglo-Norman from Latin circulāris from circulus circle circle
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English, from Old French circulier, from Latin circularis, from circulus, diminutive of circus (“ring”).
    From Wiktionary