Buffer meaning

bŭfər
The definition of a buffer is something that keeps opposing elements separated or someone who helps people get along who are argumentative with each other.

An example of a buffer is a piece of land between two cities.

An example of a buffer is a mediator at divorce proceedings who helps the arguing couple to not fight as they try to settle their property issues.

noun
3
1
One that protects by intercepting or moderating adverse pressures or influences.
noun
1
0
Something that separates potentially antagonistic entities, as an area between two rival powers that serves to lessen the danger of conflict.
noun
0
0
A solution that resists a change in acidity when an acid or base is added to it, or a substance that facilitates this resistance.
noun
0
0
A device or area used to store data temporarily.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To act as a buffer for or between.
verb
0
0
To treat (a solution) with a buffer.
verb
0
0
To hold or collect (data) in a buffer.
verb
0
0
A person who buffs or polishes.
noun
0
0
A buffing wheel, stick, block, or cloth.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A device using padding, springs, hydraulic pressure, etc. to lessen or absorb the shock of collision or impact.
noun
0
0
Any person or thing that serves to lessen shock or prevent sharp impact, as between antagonistic forces.
noun
0
0
Any substance in a solution that tends to stabilize the hydrogen ion concentration by neutralizing any added acid or alkali.
noun
0
0
A computer storage area that temporarily holds data being transferred from one device to another, as to compensate for the different processing rates of the devices.
noun
0
0
To protect against shock or impact; cushion or insulate.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To add a buffer to (a solution)
verb
0
0
An elderly man variously regarded as old-fashioned, stodgy, ineffectual, etc.
noun
0
0
A substance that prevents change in the acidity of a solution when an acid or base is added to the solution or when the solution is diluted. Buffers are used to make solutions of known pH, especially for instrument calibration purposes. Natural buffers also exist in living organisms, where biochemical reactions are very sensitive to changes in pH.
0
0
A device or an area of a computer that temporarily stores data that is being transferred between two machines that process data at different rates, such as a computer and a printer.
0
0
A reserved segment of memory within a program that is used to hold the data being processed. Buffers are set up to hold data coming in from and going out to the network or a local file. In a streaming media application, the program uses buffers to store an advance supply of audio or video data to compensate for momentary delays.With computers, each application can allocate and deallocate its buffers from the general memory pool. For printers and other peripherals, the buffers provide temporary storage for data in the memory of the device. See buffering, double buffering, buffer overflow, buffer flush and bucket.
0
0
Advertisement
A region of memory that temporarily stores data in a networking device, commonly to compensate for congestion at an incoming or outgoing port on a concentrator, multiplexer, switch, or router. If, for example, the level of incoming traffic exceeds the resources of a switch, a buffer at the incoming switch port can temporarily store the excess traffic until the switch has sufficient resources to process the traffic. If the level of outgoing traffic exceeds the capacity of the circuit, a buffer at the outgoing switch port can temporarily store the excess traffic until the circuit can accommodate it. A buffer also can serve to store packet data temporarily to allow retransmission in the event that a downstream device does not receive the packet without error within an acceptable period of time.
0
0
A standalone storage device specifically designed to store data until such time as it is downloaded by another device for processing. A PBX system, for example, commonly outputs call detail records to a buffer, which stores them in temporary memory until a centralized poller accesses the buffer and downloads the data for subsequent processing into various call detail reports for purposes of cost allocation and management, traffic analysis, and security analysis.
0
0
Electrically powered mechanical device that rotates abrasive pads for cleaning floors. Buffers are known to cause network problems when plugged into shared outlets by injecting electrical noise or blowing fuses. Note: It is always a good idea to make sure that a computer system has access to clean power, i.e., a dedicated circuit that, by definition, will be free of power dips caused by buffers and other devices. See also CDR and register.
0
0
A protective material sometimes extruded directly on the acrylate coating of an optical fiber to further allow individual fibers to be handled easily during installation, while protecting them from physical damage. A tight buffered cable is used for short jumper cables and many other indoor applications where the temperature is controlled and the differences in thermal expansion and contraction are not so great between the buffer and fiber as to cause bending, which ultimately can lead to cracking and breaking of the fiber. See also loose-tube cable.
0
0
Someone or something that buffs.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(chemistry) A solution used to stabilize the pH (acidity) of a liquid.
noun
0
0
(computing) A portion of memory set aside to store data, often before it is sent to an external device or as it is received from an external device.
noun
0
0
(mechanical) Anything used to maintain slack or isolate different objects.
noun
0
0
(telecommunications) A routine or storage medium used to compensate for a difference in rate of flow of data, or time of occurrence of events, when transferring data from one device to another.
noun
0
0
(rail transport) A device on trains and carriages designed to cushion the impact between them.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(rail transport) The metal barrier to help prevent trains from running off the end of the track.
noun
0
0
An isolating circuit, often an amplifier, used to minimize the influence of a driven circuit on the driving circuit.
noun
0
0
(politics, international relations) A buffer zone (such as a demilitarized zone) or a buffer state.
noun
0
0
(colloquial) A good-humoured, slow-witted fellow, usually an elderly man.

noun
0
0
(figuratively) A gap that isolates or separates two things.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To use a buffer or buffers; to isolate or minimize the effects of one thing on another.
verb
0
0
(computing) To store data in memory temporarily.
verb
0
0
Comparative form of buff: more buff.
adjective
0
0
To buffer is to lessen or reduce the impact of sound or impact.

An example of buffer is to add insulation which buffers the sound from outside.

verb
0
1
One that buffs, especially a piece of soft leather or cloth used to shine or polish.
noun
0
1
Advertisement
A buffing wheel.
noun
0
1
Something that lessens or absorbs the shock of an impact.
noun
0
1

Origin of buffer

  • Probably from obsolete buff to make a sound like a soft body being hit of imitative origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Agent noun from obsolete verb buff (“make a dull sound when struck”)(mid-16c.), from Old French buffe (“blow”).

    From Wiktionary