Brit meaning

brĭt
Minute marine organisms, such as crustaceans of the genus Calanus, that are a major source of food for right whales.
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The young of herring and similar fish.
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A British person.
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Britain.
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British.
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The young of the herring and some other fishes.
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Small sea animals, esp. certain crustaceans, as copepods, eaten by the baleen whales and many fishes.
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British.
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Britisher.
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British.
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To break in pieces; divide.
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(intransitive) To fall out or shatter (as overripe hops or grain).
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(intransitive, dialectal) To fade away; alter.
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One of the young of herrings, sprats etc.
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One of the tiny crustaceans, of the genus Calanus, that are part of the diet of right whales.
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Brit milah.
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(informal, formerly offensive) A British person.
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(lexicography) British English.
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Origin of brit

  • Perhaps from Cornish brȳthel mackerel (from Old Cornish breithil) (from breith speckled) or from Welsh brithyll trout (from brith speckled)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English brytten, brutten, from Old English brittian, bryttian (“to divide, dispense, distribute, rule over, possess, enjoy the use of”), from Proto-Germanic *brutjaną (“to break, divide”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰreud- (“to break”). Cognate with Icelandic brytja (“to chop up, break in pieces, slaughter”), Swedish bryta (“to break, fracture, cut off”), Danish bryde (“to break”) and Albanian brydh (“I make crumbly, friable, soft”). Related to Old English brytta (“dispenser, giver, author, governor, prince”), Old English brēotan (“to break in pieces, hew down, demolish, destroy, kill”).
    From Wiktionary
  • 1901, either a shortening of Britisher or Briton, or a back-formation from British.
    From Wiktionary
  • Probably from Middle English bret or birt, applied to a different kind of fish. See bret.
    From Wiktionary
  • Shortened from British.
    From Wiktionary
  • Short for brit milah.
    From Wiktionary