Belladonna meaning

bĕlə-dŏnə
A poisonous perennial herb (Atropa belladonna) native to Eurasia and northern Africa and naturalized in parts of North America, having nodding, purplish-brown, bell-shaped flowers and glossy black berries.
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An alkaloidal extract or tincture derived from this plant and used in medicine.
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A poisonous European plant (Atropa belladonna) of the nightshade family, with purplish or reddish bell-shaped flowers and shiny black berries; deadly nightshade: it is a source of atropine.
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A poisonous perennial herb (Atropa belladonna) native to Eurasia and northern Africa and naturalized in parts of North America, having nodding, purplish-brown, bell-shaped flowers and glossy black berries.
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A preparation of the dried leaves or roots of deadly nightshade or related plants in the genus Belladonna, once used as a medicine. Belladonna contains several alkaloids that affect the nervous system by blocking the effects of acetylcholine.
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A plant, Atropa belladonna, having purple bell-shaped flowers and poisonous black glossy berries; deadly nightshade.
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An alkaloidal extract or tincture derived from this plant and used in medicine.
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An alkaloid extracted from this plant, sometimes used medicinally, containing atropine.
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Origin of belladonna

  • Italian bella feminine of bello beautiful (from Latin bellus deu-2 in Indo-European roots) donna lady Donna (the plant perhaps being so called because women of Italian courts during the Renaissance are said to have used the juice of belladonna berries to make their eyes more attractive by dilating their pupils)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Italian bella donna, literally 'beautiful lady', altered by folk etymology from Medieval Latin bladona 'nightshade', from Gaulish. The folk etymology was motivated by the cosmetic use of nightshade for dilating the eyes.

    From Wiktionary