Admiral definition

ădmər-əl
The commander in chief of a fleet.
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A flag officer.
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Any of various brightly colored nymphalid butterflies of the genera Limenitis and Vanessa, especially V. atalanta, having black wings with red bands.
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(archaic) The ship carrying an admiral; flagship.
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A commissioned rank in the US Navy or Coast Guard that is above vice admiral and below Admiral of the Fleet.
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One who holds the rank of admiral, Admiral of the Fleet, rear admiral, or vice admiral.
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The commanding officer of a navy or fleet.
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(archaic) A vessel carrying the admiral; flagship.
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Any of various large, colorful butterflies (genera Limenitis and Vanessa) with unusually small forelegs.
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An officer of the highest rank, ranking just above a vice admiral and having the insignia of four stars.
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Generally, any of the officers ranking above a captain, with admiral as part of the title of their rank.
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A naval officer of the highest rank; the commander of a country's naval forces.
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A naval officer of high rank, immediately below Admiral of the Fleet; the commander of a fleet or squadron.
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A flag officer in the United States Navy or Coast Guard of a grade superior to vice admiral and junior to admiral of the fleet (when that grade is used). An admiral is equal in grade or rank to a four star general.
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The ship which carries the admiral, the flagship; also, the most considerable ship of a fleet.
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Any of various nymphalid butterflies of Europe and America, especially a red admiral or white admiral.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
admiral
Plural:
admirals

Origin of admiral

  • Middle English amiral, admiral from Old French and from Medieval Latin amīrālis, admīrālis both from Arabic ’amīr al- ... commander of the ... ’amīr commander ℵmr in Semitic roots al- the

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French amirail, amiral (modern amiral), from Arabic أمير البحر (ʾamīr al-baḥr, “commander of the fleet”). Later associated with admirable. Akin to amir, Amir and emir.

    From Wiktionary

  • First recorded in English September, 1300, to refer to Gerard Allard of Winchelsea, referred to as “Admiral of the Fleet of the Cinque Ports”.

    From Wiktionary

  • c. 1205 (?).

    From Wiktionary