Yiddish meaning

yĭdĭsh
The language historically of Ashkenazic Jews of Central and Eastern Europe, resulting from a fusion of elements derived principally from medieval German dialects and secondarily from Hebrew and Aramaic, various Slavic languages, and Old French and Old Italian.
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A language derived from Middle High German, spoken by E European Jews and their descendants in other countries: it is written in the Hebrew alphabet and contains vocabulary borrowings from Hebrew, Russian, Polish, English, etc.
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Of or in this language.
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Of or pertaining to the Yiddish language.
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(informal) Jewish.
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A West Germanic language that developed from Middle High German dialects, with an admixture of vocabulary from multiple source languages including Hebrew-Aramaic, Romance, Slavic, English, etc., and written in Hebrew characters which is used mainly among Ashkenazic Jews from central and eastern Europe.
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Origin of yiddish

  • Yiddish yidish Jewish, Yiddish from Middle High German jüdisch Jewish from jude, jüde Jew from Old High German judo from Latin Iūdaeus Jew

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Yiddish ייִדיש, from Yidish Daytsh, from Middle High German jüdisch diutsch (“Jewish German"), cognate with German jüdisch (“Jewish").

    From Wiktionary

  • Since Jewish Germans (Yiddish) had to exist before a Yiddish language could be created, the term is probably Middle High German, rather than Yiddish.

    From Wiktionary