Trepan meaning

trĭ-păn
A trickster.
noun
0
0
A trick or snare.
noun
0
0
An early form of the trephine.
noun
0
0
A heavy boring tool for sinking shafts, quarrying, etc.
noun
0
0
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To cut a disk out of (a metal plate, ingot, etc.)
verb
0
0
A person or thing that tricks, traps, or ensnares.
noun
0
0
A trick; stratagem; trap.
noun
0
0
To trick, trap, or lure.
verb
0
0
A trephine.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
To bore or otherwise make a hole in the skull, as in certain prehistoric cultures or in surgery using a trephine.
verb
0
0
A tool used to bore through rock when sinking shafts.
noun
0
0
(medicine) A surgical instrument used to remove a circular section of bone from the skull; a trephine.
noun
0
0
(manufacturing, mining) To create a large hole by making a narrow groove outlining the shape of the hole and then removing the plug of material remaining by less expensive means.
verb
0
0
(medicine) To use a trepan; to trephine.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
(archaic) A trickster.
noun
0
0
(archaic) A snare; a trapan.
noun
0
0
(archaic) To trick; to ensnare; to seduce.
verb
0
0
A rock-boring tool used in mining for sinking shafts.
noun
0
1
A trephine.
noun
0
1
Advertisement
To bore (a shaft) with a trepan.
verb
0
1
To bore or otherwise make a hole in (the skull), as in certain prehistoric cultures or in surgery using a trephine.
verb
0
1
To trap; ensnare.
verb
0
1

Origin of trepan

  • Middle English trepane surgical crown saw from Medieval Latin trepanum from Greek trūpanon borer from trūpān to pierce from trūpē hole terə-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Possibly from Old English treppan (“to trap").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Wiktionary