Treble meaning

trĕbəl
Triple.
adjective
1
0
(music) Relating to or having the highest part, voice, or range.
adjective
0
0
High-pitched; shrill.
adjective
0
0
A high, shrill sound or voice.
noun
0
0
To make or become triple.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
Threefold; triple.
adjective
0
0
High-pitched or shrill.
adjective
0
0
The highest part in musical harmony; soprano.
noun
0
0
A singer or instrument that takes this part.
noun
0
0
A high-pitched voice or sound.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
The higher part of the audio-frequency band in sound reproduction.
noun
0
0
(chiefly brit.) To make or become three times as much or as many; triple.
verb
0
0
Threefold, triple.
adjective
0
0
(music) Pertaining to the highest singing voice or part in harmonized music; soprano.
adjective
0
0
High in pitch; shrill.
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
Trebly; triply.

adverb
0
0
(music) The highest singing voice (especially as for a boy) or part in musical composition.
noun
0
0
(music) A person or instrument having a treble voice or pitch; a boy soprano.
noun
0
0
Any high-pitched or shrill voice or sound.
noun
0
0
A threefold quantity or number; something having three parts or having been tripled.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(darts) Any of the narrow areas enclosed by the two central circles on a dartboard, worth three times the usual value of the segment.
noun
0
0
(sports) Three goals, victories, awards etc. in a given match or season.
noun
0
0
To multiply by three; to make into three parts, layers, or thrice the amount.
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To become multiplied by three or increased threefold.
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To make a shrill or high-pitched noise.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To utter in a treble key; to whine.
verb
0
0

Origin of treble

  • Middle English from Old French from Medieval Latin triplum from Latin neuter of triplus triple triple

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French treble, from Latin triplus.

    From Wiktionary