Torch definition

tôrch
(slang) An arsonist.
noun
3
0
A portable apparatus that produces a very hot flame by the combustion of gases, used in welding and construction.
noun
3
0
Something that serves to illuminate, enlighten, or guide.
noun
4
2
To cause to burn or undergo combustion, especially with extraordinary rapidity, force, or thoroughness.
verb
3
1
The definition of a torch is a light made of a long piece of wood with a flammable end, or a tool used to make heat, or a flashlight in the UK.

An example of a torch is a Tiki torch used to light up outdoor parties.

An example of a torch is a welding torch, used to fuse metals together.

An example of a torch is a flashlight in London.

noun
2
0
Advertisement
Longstanding unrequited romantic feelings for a person.

My torch for her has finally gone out.

noun
1
0
A portable light produced by the flame of a stick of resinous wood or of a flammable material wound about the end of a stick of wood; a flambeau.
noun
1
0
(chiefly british) A flashlight.
noun
1
0
A portable light consisting of a long piece of resinous wood, or twisted tow dipped in tallow, etc., flaming at one end; link; flambeau.
noun
1
0
Anything considered as a source of enlightenment, illumination, inspiration, etc.

The torch of science.

noun
1
0
Advertisement
Any of various portable devices for producing a very hot flame, used in welding, burning off paint, etc.
noun
1
0
(brit.) A flashlight.
noun
1
0
(informal) To set fire to, as in arson.
verb
1
0
A stick with a flame on one end, used chiefly as a light source; a similarly shaped implement with a replaceable supply of flammable material.

The mob of angry villagers carried torches and pitchforks to the vampire"²s castle.

noun
1
0
(UK, Australia, New Zealand) A portable light source powered by electricity; a flashlight.

Ernst slipped and dropped his torch on the flagstones, shattering the bulb and plunging us into darkness.

noun
1
0
Advertisement
(slang, US): An arsonist.
noun
1
0
To set fire to, especially by use of a torch (flaming stick).

Some hoodlums had torched a derelict automobile, which emitted a ghastly pall of thick, black smoke that filled the street.

verb
1
0
carry a torch
  • To have longstanding feelings of love that are not requited:
    Still carrying the torch for a man she knew in her twenties.
idiom
1
0
put to the torch
  • To destroy by fire; burn down.
idiom
1
0
carry a torch for
  • to be in love with (someone) for a period of time, esp. without having one's love returned
idiom
1
0
Advertisement
pass the torch
  • to give up to another person one's status of importance or influence
idiom
1
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
torch
Plural:
torches

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of torch

  • Middle English torche from Old French from Vulgar Latin torca alteration of Latin torqua variant of torquēs torque from Latin torquēre to twist terkw- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French torche, ultimately from Latin torqueō (“twist").

    From Wiktionary