Stoic meaning

stōĭk
Not affected by pain or distress.
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A person indifferent to pleasure or pain.
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A member of an originally Greek school of philosophy, founded by Zeno of Citium about 308 bc , believing that God determined everything for the best and that virtue is sufficient for happiness. Its later Roman form advocated the calm acceptance of all occurrences as the unavoidable result of divine will or of the natural order.
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Of or relating to the Stoics or their philosophy.
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A stoical person.
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The definition of stoic is someone who seems detached from their emotions.

An example of stoic is not crying at a funeral.

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Alternative capitalization of stoic.
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A stoic is defined as someone who seems indifferent to emotions.

An example of stoic is a mother not showing happiness at her daughter's wedding.

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A member of a Greek school of philosophy founded by Zeno about 308 b.c., holding that all things are governed by unvarying natural laws, and that the wise man is led by reason to live virtuously and free from passion, accepting calmly whatever happens.
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One who is seemingly indifferent to or unaffected by joy, grief, pleasure, or pain.
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Seemingly indifferent to or unaffected by pleasure or pain; impassive.
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Of the Stoics or their philosophy.
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(philosophy) Proponent of a school of thought, from in 300 BCE up to about the time of Marcus Aurelius, who holds that by cultivating an understanding of the logos, or natural law, one can be free of suffering.
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Of or relating to the Stoics or their ideas.
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Not displaying any external signs of being affected by pain or distress.
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Alternative capitalization of stoic.
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A student of Stowe School, England.
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Origin of stoic

  • Middle English Stoic a Stoic from Latin Stōicus from Greek Stōikos from stoā (poikilē) (Painted) Porch, where Zeno taught stā- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin stoicus, from Ancient Greek Στωϊκός (Stōikos), from Ποικίλη Στοά (PoikilÄ“ Stoa, “painted portico"), the portico in Athens where Zeno was teaching.

    From Wiktionary