Sleeve meaning

slēv
A tube or tubelike part fitting over or around another part.
noun
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The definition of a sleeve is the part of a shirt or other garment that covers your arm, or a protective covering that fits over something, such as a record.

The cotton material that extends from the shoulder of your shirt down to your wrists is an example of a sleeve.

The white paper envelope that a CD or record fits into is an example of a sleeve.

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A part of a garment that covers all or part of an arm.
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A case into which an object or device fits.

A record sleeve.

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A tattoo that covers all or a large part of the arm.
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To furnish or fit with sleeves or a sleeve.
verb
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That part of a garment that covers an arm or part of an arm.
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A thin paper or plastic cover for protecting a phonograph record, usually within a jacket.
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A drogue towed by an airplane for target practice.
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Tattooing covering much or most of the arm.
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To provide or fit with a sleeve or sleeves.
verb
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The part of a garment that covers the arm. [from 10th c.]

The sleeves on my coat are too long.

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A (usually tubular) covering or lining to protect a piece of machinery etc. [from 19th c.]

This bearing requires a sleeve so the shaft will fit snugly.

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A protective jacket or case, especially for a record, containing art and information about the contents; also the analogous leaflet found in a packaged CD. [from 20th c.]
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A narrow channel of water.
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Sleave; untwisted thread.
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(British Columbia) A serving of beer measuring between 14 and 16 ounces.
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To fit a sleeve to.
verb
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up (one's) sleeve
  • Hidden but ready to be used:.
    I still have a few tricks up my sleeve.
idiom
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roll up one's sleeves
  • To prepare to work, esp. at a difficult task requiring prolonged effort.
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up one's sleeve
  • Hidden or secret but ready at hand.
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Origin of sleeve

  • Middle English sleve from Old English slēf sleubh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English sleve, from Old English sliefe, slefe.

    From Wiktionary