Gland meaning

glănd
Frequency:
The definition of a gland is an organ or group of cells that releases substances or waste from the body.

An example of a gland is the thyroid.

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A device, such as the outer sleeve of a stuffing box, designed to prevent a fluid from leaking past a moving machine part.
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Any organ or specialized group of cells that produces secretions, as insulin or bile, or excretions, as urine: some glands, as the liver and kidneys, have ducts that empty into an organ: the ductless (or endocrine) glands, as the thyroid and adrenals, secrete hormones.
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(loosely) Any similar structure that is not a true gland.

Lymph glands.

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(botany) An organ or a structure that secretes a substance.
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(bot.) An organ or layer of cells that produces and secretes some substance.
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(mech.) A movable part that compresses the packing in a stuffing box.
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(botany) An organ or a structure that secretes a substance.
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An organ or group of specialized cells in the body that produces and secretes a specific substance, such as a hormone.
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(zoology) An organ that synthesizes a substance, such as hormones or breast milk, and releases it, often into the bloodstream (endocrine gland) or into cavities inside the body or its outer surface (exocrine gland).
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(botany) A secretory structure on the surface of an organ.
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(mechanical) A compressable cylindrical case and its contents around a shaft where it passes through a barrier, intended to prevent the passage of a fluid past the barrier. Examples.

A. used around a ship’s propeller shaft.

B. used around a tap, valve or faucet.

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Origin of gland

  • French glande from Old French glandre alteration of Latin glandula diminutive of glāns gland- acorn

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Perhaps akin to Scots glams jaws of a vise, pincers probably from variant of clam

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin glāns, gland- (“acorn”).

    From Wiktionary

  • 19th century. Etymology unknown.

    From Wiktionary