Science meaning

sīəns
Frequency:
Systematized knowledge derived from observation, study, and experimentation carried on in order to determine the nature or principles of what is being studied.
noun
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The state or fact of knowledge; knowledge.
noun
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8
Science is observing, studying and experimenting to learn how the world works. This includes the departments of learning and bodies of fact in disciplines such as anthropology, archaeology, astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, cybernetics, geography, geology, mathematics, medicine, physics, physiology, psychology, social science, sociology, and zoology.

An example of science is biology.

noun
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11
The investigation of natural phenomena through observation, theoretical explanation, and experimentation, or the knowledge produced by such investigation. &diamf3; Science makes use of the scientific method , which includes the careful observation of natural phenomena, the formulation of a hypothesis, the conducting of one or more experiments to test the hypothesis, and the drawing of a conclusion that confirms or modifies the hypothesis.
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5
Knowledge, especially that gained through experience.
noun
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8
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Any specific branch of scientific knowledge, esp. one concerned with establishing and systematizing facts, principles, and methods, as by experiments and hypotheses.

The science of mathematics.

noun
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5
(uncountable) The collective discipline of study or learning acquired through the scientific method; the sum of knowledge gained from such methods and discipline. [from 18th c.]
noun
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3
A systematic method or body of knowledge in a given area.

The science of marketing.

noun
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3
(countable) A particular discipline or branch of learning, especially one dealing with measurable or systematic principles rather than intuition or natural ability. [from 14th c.]

Of course in my opinion Social Studies is more of a science than an art.

noun
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3
(uncountable) Knowledge derived from scientific disciplines, scientific method, or any systematic effort.
noun
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Skill based upon systematized training.

The science of cooking.

noun
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(uncountable, archaic) Knowledge gained through study or practice; mastery of a particular discipline or area. [from 14th c.]
noun
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Obsolete spelling of scion.
noun
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5
A systematic method or body of knowledge in a given area.

The science of marketing.

noun
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(now only theology) The fact of knowing something; knowledge or understanding of a truth. [from 14th c.]
noun
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To cause to become versed in science; to make skilled; to instruct.

verb
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Origin of science

  • Middle English knowledge, learning from Old French from Latin scientia from sciēns scient- present participle of scīre to know skei- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French science, from Latin scientia (“knowledge"), from sciens, the present participle stem of scire (“know").

    From Wiktionary

  • See scion.

    From Wiktionary