Salamander definitions

săl'ə-măn'dər
Any of various small, tailed amphibians of the order Caudata, having porous scaleless skin and usually two pairs of limbs of equal size, found chiefly in northern temperate regions.
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An object, such as a poker, used in fire or capable of withstanding heat.
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A mythological reptile, resembling the lizard, that was said to live in fire.
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A mass of solidified material, largely metallic, left in a blast-furnace hearth.
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A spirit supposed to live in fire: orig., a spirit in Paracelsus' alchemical system.
noun
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A portable stove used to heat or dry buildings under construction.
noun
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Any of various articles used in fire or able to produce or withstand heat, as a poker, portable oven, or a utensil for browning pastry.
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Any of an order (Caudata) of limbed, tailed amphibians with a soft, moist skin.
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Any of various small, tailed amphibians of the order Caudata, having porous scaleless skin and usually two pairs of limbs of equal size, found chiefly in northern temperate regions.
noun
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A long slender (usually) terrestrial amphibian, resembling a lizard and newt; taxonomic order Urodela.
noun
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(cooking) A metal utensil with a flat head which is heated and put over a dish to brown the top.

1977: The salamander, a fairly long metal utensil with a flat rounded head, was left in the fire until red hot and then used to brown the top of a dish without further cooking. — Richard Daunton-Fear and Penelope Vigar, Australian Colonial Cookery, Rigby, 1977, ISBN 0-7270-0187-6, page 41 (discussing 19th century cookery)

noun
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(mythology) A creature much like a lizard that is resistant to and lives in fire, hence the elemental being of fire.
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(cooking) In a professional kitchen a small broiler, used primarily for browning.

The chef first put the steak under the salamander to sear the outside.

noun
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The pouched gopher (Geomys tuza) of the southern United States.
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(metallurgy) Solidified material in a furnace hearth.
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To apply a salamander (flat iron utensil above) in a cooking process.

19th C.: When cold, sprinkle the custard thickly with sugar and salamander it. — a 19th century crème brûlée recipe quoted in Richard Daunton-Fear and Penelope Vigar, Australian Colonial Cookery, Rigby, 1977, ISBN 0-7270-0187-6, page 41

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Origin of salamander

From Old French salamandre, from Latin salamandra, from Ancient Greek σαλαμάνδρα (salamandra), of uncertain origin.