Poker meaning

pō'kər
A card game in which the players bet on the value of their hands (of five cards), the bets forming a pool to be taken by the player who remains after all others have dropped out of the betting or who holds the highest hand: there are several varieties.
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A person or thing that pokes.
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A rod, usually of iron, for stirring a fire.
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One that pokes, especially a metal rod used to stir a fire.
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Any of various card games played by two or more players who bet on the value of their hands.
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A metal rod, generally of wrought iron, for adjusting the burning logs or coals in a fire; a firestick. [from earlier 16th c.]
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One who pokes.
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A kind of duck, the pochard.
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Any of various card games in which, following each of one or more rounds of dealing or revealing the cards, the players in sequence make tactical bets or drop out, the bets forming a pool to be taken either by the sole remaining player or, after all rounds and bets have been completed, by those remaining players who hold a superior hand according to a standard ranking of hand values for the game. [from earlier 19th c.]
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(poker) All the four cards of the same rank.
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(US, colloquial) Any imagined frightful object, especially one supposed to haunt the darkness; a bugbear.
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Origin of poker

  • Probably from French poque a card game similar to poker popular in the 18th century probably from German pochen to knock, pound, boast, brag (as in (ich) poche (I) knock, bet (said while rapping the table when opening in the German card game Pochspiel)) akin to German poch interjection imitative of a knock
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • American English, perhaps from first element of German Pochspiel, from German pochen, perhaps from French poque
    From Wiktionary
  • Compare Danish pokker (“the deuce, devil”), and English puck.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Wiktionary