Reform meaning

rĭ-fôrm
Reform is defined as to correct someone or something or cause someone or something to be better.

An example of reform is sending a troubled teenager to juvenile hall for a month and having the teenager return better behaved.

verb
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To improve by alteration, correction of error, or removal of defects; put into a better form or condition.

Reform the tax code.

verb
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To subject (hydrocarbons) to cracking.
verb
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Action to improve or correct what is wrong or defective in something.

Health care reform.

noun
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A movement aimed at removing political or social abuses.
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An instance of this; an improvement.

Reforms in education.

noun
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Relating to or favoring reform.

A reform candidate for mayor.

adjective
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Of or relating to Reform Judaism.
adjective
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To cause or persuade (a person) to give up misconduct and behave better.
verb
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To heat (petroleum products) under pressure, with or without catalysts, to produce cracking and a greater yield of gasoline or an improved octane number.
verb
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To become better in behavior.
verb
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A correction of faults or evils, as in government or society; social or political improvement.
noun
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An improvement in character and conduct; reformation.
noun
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Designating or of a movement in Judaism that attempts to make rational thought compatible with historical Judaism, stressing its ethical aspects and not requiring strict observance of traditional Orthodox ritual.
adjective
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Amendment of what is defective, vicious, corrupt, or depraved; reformation; as, reform of elections; reform of government.
noun
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To put into a new and improved form or condition; to restore to a former good state, or bring from bad to good; to change from worse to better; to amend; to correct.

To reform a profligate man; to reform corrupt manners or morals.

verb
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To return to a good state; to amend or correct one's own character or habits; as, a person of settled habits of vice will seldom reform.
verb
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(intransitive) To form again or in a new configuration.

This product contains reformed meat.

The pop group reformed for one final tour.

verb
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To induce or persuade (a person) to give up harmful or immoral practices; cause to adopt a better way of life.
verb
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To change for the better.
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To make better by removing faults and defects; correct.

To reform a calendar.

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Origin of reform

  • Middle English reformen from Old French reformer from Latin refōrmāre re- re- fōrmāre to shape (from fōrma form)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • French réforme

    From Wiktionary