Random meaning

răndəm
Having no specific pattern, purpose, or objective.

Random movements.

adjective
16
2
The definition of random is an action that happens without order or without reason.

An example of random is when you close your eyes and choose one of two options.

An example of random is violence where the criminal doesn't care who the victim is and has no reason for his action.

adjective
9
1
Of or relating to an event in which all outcomes are equally likely, as in the testing of a blood sample for the presence of a substance.
adjective
4
1
(mathematics & statistics) Of or relating to a type of circumstance or event that is described by a probability distribution.
adjective
4
3
Lacking aim or method; purposeless; haphazard.
adjective
2
1
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Impetuous and haphazard movement.
noun
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2
(computing) Pseudorandom in contrast to truly random; mimicking the result of random selection.

The rand function generates a random number from a seed.

adjective
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(somewhat colloquial) Representative and undistinguished; typical and average; selected for no particular reason.

A random American off the street couldn't tell the difference.

adjective
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(somewhat colloquial) Apropos of nothing; lacking context; unexpected; having apparent lack of plan, cause, or reason.

That was a completely random comment.

The teacher's bartending story was interesting, but random.

The narrative takes a random course.

adjective
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(colloquial) Characterized by or often saying random things; habitually using non sequiturs.

You're so random!

adjective
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Not uniform; esp., of different sizes.
adjective
1
1
(statistics) Of statistical sample selection in which all possible samples have equal probability of selection.
adjective
1
1
Relating to a type of circumstance or event that is described by a probability distribution.
1
1
Relating to an event in which all outcomes are equally likely, as in the testing of a blood sample for the presence of a substance.
1
1
A roving motion; course without definite direction; lack of rule or method; chance.
noun
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E. Hall.

For courageously the two kings newly fought with great random and force.

noun
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(figuratively, colloquial) An undefined, unknown or unimportant person; a person of no consequence. [from 20th c.]

The party was boring. It was full of randoms.

noun
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1
(mining) The direction of a rake-vein.

noun
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Having unpredictable outcomes and, in the ideal case, all outcomes equally probable; resulting from such selection; lacking statistical correlation.

The flip of a fair coin is purely random.

The newspaper conducted a random sample of five hundred American teenagers.

The results of the field survey look random by several different measures.

adjective
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(mathematics) Of or relating to probability distribution.

A toss of loaded dice is still random, though biased.

adjective
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at random
  • Without a governing design, method, or purpose; unsystematically:
    Chose a card at random from the deck.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of random

  • From at random by chance, at great speed from Middle English randon speed, violence from Old French from randir to run of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English raundon, from Old French randon, from randir (“to gallop") (whence French randonnée (“long walk, hike")), from Frankish *rant, *rand (“a running"), from Proto-Germanic *randijō (“a running"), from Proto-Germanic *rinnanÄ… (“to run"), from Proto-Indo-European *ren- (“to rise; to sink"). See run.

    From Wiktionary