Pyrite meaning

pīrīt
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A brass-colored mineral, FeS2 , occurring widely and used as an iron ore and in producing sulfur dioxide for sulfuric acid.
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A hard, brittle, yellow mineral, FeS2, dimorphic with marcasite and occurring abundantly as a native ore, used to make sulfuric acid; iron sulfide.
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A silver to yellow, metallic, cubic mineral. Pyrite often crystallizes in cubes or octahedrons but also occurs as shapeless masses of grains. It occurs in most types of rocks, and is used as a source of iron and in making sulfur dioxide. It is a polymorph of marcasite. Because of its shiny look and often yellow color, it is sometimes mistaken for gold and for this reason is also called fool's gold. Chemical formula: FeS2.
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(mineralogy) The common mineral iron disulfide (FeS2), of a pale brass-yellow color and brilliant metallic luster, crystallizing in the isometric system.
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(usually as a plural: pyrites) Any metallic-looking sulphide, such as the above, which is the most common.
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(solid state chemistry) (usually as a plural: pyrites) Any metal dichalcogenide that is isostructural to the common mineral.

Copper diselenide can occur both as a marcasite and a pyrite.

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Origin of pyrite

  • Middle English perides, pirite from Old French pirite from Latin pyrītēs flint pyrites

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • recorded since 1555, from Old French (=modern) pyrite (12c.), from Latin pyrites, from Ancient Greek πυρίτης λιθός (pyrites lithos) "stone of fire, flint" (so called because it glitters), notably the first part: adjective πυρίτης (puritēs, “of or in fire”), from πῦρ (pur, “fire”)

    From Wiktionary