Portal meaning

pôrtl
Frequency:
A doorway, entrance, or gate, especially one that is large and imposing.
noun
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An entrance or a means of entrance.

The local library, a portal of knowledge.

noun
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A doorway, gate, or entrance, esp. a large and imposing one.
noun
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Any point or place of entry, specif. one where nerves, vessels, etc. enter an organ.
noun
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The portal vein.
noun
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Of or relating to a point of entrance to an organ, especially the transverse fissure of the liver, through which the blood vessels enter.
adjective
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Of or relating to the portal vein or the portal system.
adjective
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A website designed to provide access to numerous other sites and, variously, e-mail service, online shopping, etc.
noun
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Designating, of, or like the vein carrying blood from the intestines, stomach, etc. to the liver.
adjective
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The portal vein.
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Relating to the portal vein or the portal system.
adjective
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Relating to a point of entrance to an organ, especially the transverse fissure of the liver, through which the blood vessels enter.
adjective
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The definition of a portal is a gateway or entry to something else.

An example of a portal is a door into a room.

An example of a portal is a website that takes you to many other websites.

noun
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An automated trading system operated by the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) to trade unregistered foreign and domestic securities.
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A site on the World Wide Web (WWW) that serves as a gateway or port of entry to the Internet. A portal typically includes hyperlinks to news, weather reports, stock market quotes, entertainment, chat rooms, and so on. See also chat room, gateway, hyperlink, and WWW.
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Known also as Web portal, is a special kind of Website. The term portal was initially given to large Internet search engines that expanded their offerings to include email, news, stock quotes, and other information tidbits of practical use. Some large companies developed Intranet Websites with a similar approach, giving way to what is now known as “enterprise information” or “corporate portals.” A portal typically has a home page allowing for navigation of loosely integrated features provided by a c­ompany’s divisions or by independent third parties and a large, diversified target audience. About, Inc. Portal. [Online, 2004.] About, Inc. Website. http:// compnetworking.about.com/library/glossary/bldef-portal.htm.
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noun
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An entrance, entry point, or means of entry.

The local library, a portal of knowledge.

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(Internet) A website that acts as an entrance to other websites on the Internet.

The new medical portal has dozens of topical categories containing links to hundreds of sites.

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(anatomy) A short vein that carries blood into the liver.
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(fiction) A magical or technological doorway leading to another location, period in time or dimension.
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(architecture) A lesser gate, where there are two of different dimensions.
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(architecture) Formerly, a small square corner in a room separated from the rest of an apartment by wainscoting, forming a short passage to another apartment.
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(bridge-building) The space, at one end, between opposite trusses when these are terminated by inclined braces.
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A prayer book or breviary; a portass.
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(anatomy) Of or relating to a porta, especially the porta of the liver.

The portal vein.

adjective
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A website considered as an entry point to other websites, often by being or providing access to a search engine.
noun
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Origin of portal

  • Middle English from Old French from Medieval Latin portāle city gate from neuter of portālis of a gate from Latin porta gate per-2 in Indo-European roots N., sense 3 and adj., from New Latin porta (hepatis) transverse fissure (of the liver), literally gate of the liver perhaps ultimately translation of Akkadian bāb (ekalli) gate (of the palace), umbilical fissure of the liver (next to the transverse fissure)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Medieval Latin portale, from Latin porta

    From Wiktionary