Pluto definition

plo͝otō
(class. myth., person, proper) The god ruling over the lower world.
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(roman mythology) The god of the dead and the ruler of the underworld, identified with the Greek Hades.
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Pluto is only 0.07 times the mass of the other celestial objects found in its orbit, so it does not meet the IAU's third criteria that an object "should be the dominant gravitational body in its orbit."
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The definition of Pluto is a dwarf planet that was once designated as the ninth planet from the sun.
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Pluto was first discovered by Clyde W. Tombaugh in 1930.
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The name Pluto originated when an 11 year old girl suggested that the solar system’s smallest planet should be named after the Roman God of the underworld, Pluto, because it is so far from the light of the sun.
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The diameter of Pluto is 2274 km or 1413 miles.
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Is about 70% rock and 30% ice made from water.
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Has an atmosphere of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and methane.
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Has a temperature that ranges from -235 to -210 degrees C, or from -391 to -346 degrees Fahrenheit.
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Pluto has three moons - Charon, Nix and Hydra.
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In 2006, the IAU officially downgraded Pluto and took away Pluto's planetary title and status. Instead, Pluto was labeled a dwarf planet.
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NASA has sent their "New Horizons" spacecraft to touchdown on Pluto in 2015.

An example of Pluto is the former planet that is now designated as a dwarf planet.

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(place, proper) A large dwarf planet orbiting beyond Neptune: diameter, c. 2,270 km (c. 1,410 mi); period of revolution, c. 248.59 earth years; period of rotation (retrograde), 6.39 earth days; three satellites; symbol, ♇: formerly classified as the ninth major planet.
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A dwarf planet that until 2006 was classified as the ninth planet in the Solar System. Pluto was not discovered until 1930, when Clyde Tombaugh noticed it while searching for an unknown planet thought to influence Uranus's orbit. Pluto's surface is covered with frozen methane and other ices, and its extremely thin atmosphere consists primarily of methane and nitrogen. Between 1979 and 1999 Pluto crossed inside Neptune's orbit. Pluto has three moons: Charon (discovered in 1978) and Hydra and Nix (both discovered in 2005).
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(neologism) To demote or devalue something.
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(Greek mythology, Roman mythology) Greco-Roman god of the underworld.
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(astronomy) Originally known as the ninth planet but reclassified in 2006 as a dwarf planet, the brightest and first known Kuiper belt object, represented by the symbol ♇ in astronomy and in astrology.
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Forming compound words relating to wealth or money.
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A dwarf planet having a sidereal period of revolution about the sun of 248.5 years, a highly elliptical orbit with a perihelion distance of 4.4 billion kilometers (2.8 billion miles) and an aphelion distance of 7.4 billion kilometers (4.6 billion miles), and a mean equatorial diameter of 2,302 kilometers (1,485 miles), less than half that of Earth. Until 2006, Pluto was classified as the ninth planet in the solar system.
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Origin of pluto

  • Latin Plūtō Plūtōn- from Greek Ploutōn from ploutos wealth (from the belief that the underworld was the source of wealth from the ground) pleu- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Originally coined in 2006 by the American Dialect Society, defeating climate canary. Was believed by many to be a self-promotion attempt.

    From Wiktionary

  • From combining form of Ancient Greek πλοῦτος (ploutos, “wealth, riches”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Ancient Greek Πλούτων (Plutōn)

    From Wiktionary