Plank meaning

plăngk
A long, broad, thick board.
noun
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To furnish or cover with planks.

Plank a muddy pathway.

verb
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noun
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To cover, lay, or furnish with planks.
verb
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A long, broad and thick piece of timber, as opposed to a board which is less thick.
noun
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To cover something with planking.

To plank a floor or a ship.

verb
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To bake or broil and serve (fish or meat) on a plank.
verb
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To put or set down emphatically or with force.
verb
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Something that supports or sustains.
noun
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To broil and serve (steak, fish, etc.) on a board or wooden platter.
verb
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A political issue that is of concern to a faction or a party of the people and the political position that is taken on that issue.
noun
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Physical exercise in which one holds a pushup position for a measured length of time.
noun
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Any of the articles or principles making up the platform or stated program of a political party.
noun
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(UK, slang) A stupid person.
noun
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That which supports or upholds.
noun
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To bake (fish) on a piece of cedar lumber.
verb
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(colloquial) To lay down, as on a plank or table; to stake or pay cash.

To plank money in a wager.

verb
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To harden, as hat bodies, by felting.
verb
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To splice together the ends of slivers of wool, for subsequent drawing.
verb
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(intransitive) To pose for a photograph while lying rigid, face down, arms at side, in an unusual place.
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Plank is a flat piece of wood used in building or construction or the foundation of a political party or argument.

An example of a plank is a 3 x 4 piece of flat wood used to lay a floor.

An example of plank is the idea of free speech, which is a central plank of the first amendment.

noun
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A foundation; a support.
noun
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One of the articles of a political platform.
noun
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1
walk the plank
  • To walk to one's death blindfolded and manacled off a plank projecting from the side of a ship, as the victims of pirates were sometimes forced to do.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of plank

  • Middle English from Old North French planke from Late Latin planca from plancus flat plāk-1 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Anglo-Norman planke, Old Northern French planque (compare French planche, from Old French planche), from Late Latin planca, probably from *palanca (ultimately from Latin phalanga) possibly through the influence of planus. Cf. also the doublet planch, borrowed later from Middle French.
    From Wiktionary