Phishing meaning

fi′shiŋ
The definition of phishing is a type of Internet fraud scam where the scammer sends email messages that appear to be from financial institutions or credit card companies that try to trick recipients into giving private information (i.e., username, password, account number, etc.). The scammer uses the information to steal the recipient's identity and/or money from their account.
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Never click on a link within an email requesting that you enter your username, password, credit card number, etc.
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If you have any doubts about whether an email is real, contact the company directly to check on the authenticity of the email by using the phone number or email address on their website.
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Do not open any "fishy" emails that have misspellings, poor graphics, unusual or long URLs or emails which include a long cc list of other email addresses. Delete immediately.
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If you suspect an email is a phishing attempt, contact the company directly.
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Make sure that you have unique usernames and passwords for each account and website you regularly visit.
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Install spyware and/or a browser that alerts users to phishing websites.

An example of phishing is a spam email that looks like it comes from your bank and says you must provide your Social Security number or your account will be closed.

An example of phishing is a spam email to employees asking them to update their username and passwords.

An example of phishing is Facebook members receiving an email purportedly from Facebook, asking them to enter login details (on a replica of the Facebook homepage). This provides the phishers with the information needed to send emails to the person's friends to steal their identity or to infect their computer with viruses or spyware.

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The practice of sending fraudulent e-mail that appears to be from a legitimate business, as a bank or credit card company, in an attempt to deceive an individual into disclosing personal information, as a password or an account number.
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Pronounced "fishing," phishing is a scam to steal valuable information such as credit card and social security numbers, user IDs and passwords. Also known as "brand spoofing," an official-looking email is sent to potential victims pretending to be from their bank or retail establishment. Emails can be sent to people on any list, expecting that some percentage of recipients will actually have an account with the organization.Email Is the "Bait"The email states that due to internal accounting errors or some other pretext, certain information must be updated to continue service. A link in the message directs the user to a Web page that asks for financial information. The page looks genuine, because it is easy to fake a valid website. Any HTML page on the Web can be copied and modified to suit the phishing scheme. Rather than go to a Web page, another option asks the user to call an 800 number and speak with a live person, who makes the scam seem even more genuine.Anyone Can PhishA "phishing kit" is a set of software tools that help the novice phisher copy a target website and make mass mailings. The kit may even include lists of email addresses. See pharming, vishing, smishing, twishing and social engineering."Spear" Phishing and LongliningSpear phishing is more targeted and personal because the message supposedly comes from someone in the organization everyone knows, such as the head of human resources. It could also come from a made-up name with an authoritative title such as LAN administrator. If even one employee falls for the scheme and divulges sensitive information, it can be used to gain access to more company resources.The "longline" variant of spear phishing sends thousands of messages to the same person, expecting that the individual will eventually click a link. The longlining term comes from using a large number of hooks and bait on a long fishing line, and mobile phones are major targets for this approach.Report a Suspected SchemeAny suspected phishing scheme can be reported to the Anti-Phishing Working Group at www.antiphishing.org.
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Also known as brand spoofing and carding. A popular Internet e-mail scam that involves unsolicited e-mail (i.e., spam) contact in which the scam artist attempts to gain valuable information from the 0 90 180 270 360 0 90 180 270 360 target by gaining that person's confidence through various social engineering techniques and technical subterfuge. The term phishing was coined in the 1996 timeframe by crackers (malicious computer hackers) to describe the process of fishing for suckers by using some sort of lure or bait. (Hackers commonly replace f with ph, phor reasons that are entirely unphathomable to the rest of us.) Phishing commonly involves phony e-mails from banks, credit card companies, e-tailers, insurance companies, mortgage brokers, or other financial institutions warning that your account has been subjected to fraud or perhaps that your credit card is due to expire, and that you must confirm certain information such as an account number and password, or perhaps your social security number. The mail includes a hyperlink to a phony website that quite closely matches the legitimate website. If the scam is successful, the unsuspecting target clicks on the link and divulges information necessary for the scam artist to perhaps wipe out a bank account, max out a credit card, or even steal a person's identity, incur extraordinary debts in his name, and generally ruin his credit. See also e-mail, hyperlink, Internet, pharming, pretexting, scam, social engineering, and spam.
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A form of identity theft whereby a scammer uses an authentic-­looking email from a large corporation to trick email receivers into disclosing online sensitive personal information, such as credit card numbers or bank account codes. According to a 2004 report released by Gartner, Inc., an IT marketing research firm, phishing exploits cost banks and credit card companies an estimated $1.2 billion in 2003. Moreover, according to the Anti-Phishing Working Group (a nonprofit group of government agencies and corporations trying to reduce cyber fraud), more than 2,800 active phishing sites were known to exist. In April 2005, a new “cousin” of phishing was defined and called “WiPhishing” (pronounced “why phishing”)—an act executed when an individual covertly sets up a wireless-enabled laptop computer or access point to get other wireless-enabled laptop computers to associate with it before launching a crack attack. About 20% of wireless access points use default SSIDs. Because users failed to rename them, a cracker can quite easily guess the name of a network that target computers are normally configured to, thereby gaining access to the laptop computer and putting malicious code into it. Intrusion detection appliances such as AirPatrol Enterprise have been designed to detect wireless exploits. Firms having wired networks are at risk of being cracked if employees’ laptop computers are left on. Instead of exploiting wireless networks with WiPhishing, crackers could do even more damage by hijacking the legitimate connection to a wired computer network, exploiting the soft underbelly of that network, and launching an invasive attack. Levinsky, D. Hacker Teenage Pleads Guilty. [Online, May 14, 2005.] Calkins Media, Inc. Website. http://www.phillyburbs.com/pb-dyn/news/112-05142005-489320.html; Leyden, J. WiPhishing Hack Risk Warning. [Online, April 20, 2005.] http://www .theregister.co.uk/2005/04/20/wiphishing; MarketingSherpa, Inc. The Ultimate Email Glossary: 180 Common Terms Defined. [Online, 2004.] MarketingSherpa, Inc. Website. Reg SETI Group Website. http://www.marketingsherpa.com/sample.cfm?contentID=2776.
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(computing) The act of sending email that falsely claims to be from a legitimate organization. This is usually combined with a threat or request for information: for example, that an account will close, a balance is due, or information is missing from an account. The email will ask the recipient to supply confidential information, such as bank account details, PINs or passwords; these details are then used by the owners of the website to conduct fraud.
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The act of circumventing security with an alias.
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Present participle of phish.
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Origin of phishing

  • Respelling of fishing (“trying to find"). In Usenet newsgroups, cracker and pirate groups used variant spellings of phish and warez (i.e. wares) to evade scans and filters by mainstream servers policing the ARPAnet/Internet.

    From Wiktionary