Paw meaning

A human hand, especially a large clumsy one.
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Paw is defined as the hand or the foot of a four-legged animal.

An example of a paw is a cat's foot.

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The foot of an animal, especially a quadruped, that has claws or nails.
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To feel or strike with the paw or paws.
verb
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To strike or scrape with a beating motion.

The bull pawed the ground before charging.

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To scrape the ground with the forefeet.

The horse pawed restlessly.

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To handle someone or something clumsily, rudely, or with too much familiarity.

Don't paw at everything you see.

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The foot of a four-footed animal having claws.
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A hand.
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To touch, dig, hit, strike out (at), etc. with the paws or feet.

A horse pawing the air.

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Pa; papa; father.
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The foot of an animal, especially a quadruped mammal, that has claws or nails.
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To feel or strike with the paw or paws.
verb
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To strike or scrape with a beating motion.

The bull pawed the ground before charging.

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(nonstandard or rural) Father; pa.
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The soft foot of a mammal or other animal, generally a quadruped, that has claws or nails; comparable to a human hand or foot.
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(humorous) A hand.

Get your grubby paws off my things!

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(of an animal) To go through something (such as a garbage can) with paws.
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(of an animal) To gently push on something with a paw.
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(of an animal) To draw the forefoot along the ground; to beat or scrape with the forefoot.

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(by extension, of a human) To touch someone (with the hands) in a sexual way.
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(by extension, of a human) To clumsily dig through something.
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Paw means to touch or hit something, often in a clumsy or rough way.

An example of paw is for a cat to keep hitting a stream of water with her foot.

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Origin of paw

  • Middle English pawe from Old French powe

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English pawe, from Old French poue, poe, from Old Low Franconian *pōta (compare Dutch poot, Low German Pote, German Pfote), from *pōton 'to put, stick, plant' (compare Dutch poten 'to plant'), from Proto-Germanic *putōnÄ… (compare Old English potian 'to push', pȳtan 'to put out, poke out', Icelandic pota 'to stick', Albanian putër 'paw'), Ancient Greek "πους". More at put.

    From Wiktionary

  • From the noun paw, meaning an animal's hand or foot.

    From Wiktionary

  • The word probably has an origin in baby talk: see "˜pa'.

    From Wiktionary