Ohm-s-law meaning

ōmz
(elec.) A law which states that the current in a DC circuit is directly proportional to the applied voltage and inversely proportional to the resistance.
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The law stating that the direct current flowing in a conductor is directly proportional to the potential difference between its ends. It is usually formulated as V = IR, where V is the potential difference, or voltage, I is the current, and R is the resistance of the conductor.
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Ohm's law is a law of science that states that the current in a Direct Current (DC) circuit is directly proportional to the difference between its ends.

An example of Ohm's law is what an electrician would use when determining a problem with an electrical circuit.

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A law relating the voltage difference between two points, the electric current flowing between them, and the resistance of the path of the current. Mathematically, the law states that V = IR, where V is the voltage difference, I is the current in amperes, and R is the resistance in ohms. For a given voltage, higher resistance entails lower current flow.
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See ohm.
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V = I.
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(physics) Ohm's observation that the direct current flowing in an electrical circuit consisting only of resistances is directly proportional to the voltage applied.
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Origin of ohm-s-law

  • After Georg Simon Ohm

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Georg Ohm, German physicist

    From Wiktionary