Obtrude meaning

ŏb-tro͝od, əb-
To impose oneself on others.
verb
5
1
Obtrude is to impose, force your way in where unasked or unwanted.

When the sound of your neighbor's shouting wakes you from a nap, this is an example of when it obtrudes.

When you are having a private family scandal and the press shows up at your door to try to involve themselves and report on it, this is an example of when they obtrude.

verb
3
0
To impose (oneself or one's ideas) on others with undue insistence or without invitation.
verb
2
0
To offer or force (oneself, one's opinions, etc.) upon others unasked or unwanted.
verb
2
0
(intransitive) To become apparent in an unwelcome way, to be forcibly imposed; to jut in, to intrude (on or into). [from 16th c.]
verb
1
0
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To thrust out; push forward.
verb
0
0
To proffer (something) by force; to impose (something) on someone or into some area. [from 16th c.]
verb
0
0
(reflexive) To impose (oneself) on others; to cut in. [from 17th c.]
verb
0
0
To thrust forward; push out; eject.
verb
0
1
To obtrude oneself (on or upon)
verb
0
1
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Origin of obtrude

  • Latin obtrūdere ob- against ob– trūdere to thrust treud- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin obtrÅ«dō (“thrust off or against"), from ob- (“ob-") + trÅ«dō (“thrust").

    From Wiktionary