Ntsc definition

(National TV Standards Committee) The first television standard for the U.S., which was also adopted by Canada, Japan, South Korea and several Central and South American countries. In the U.S., the analog NTSC standard was superseded by the digital TV standard in 2009 (see digital TV transition and DTV).From Monochrome to ColorNTSC commercial broadcasting began in the U.S. for black and white TVs in the summer of 1941. A subcarrier frequency was later developed to transmit color alongside the monochrome signal, and color TV debuted on January 1, 1954 (see composite video). Before electronic TV became a standard, prototype electromechanical systems produced the first, crude video images (see video/TV history).NTSC SpecificationsAdministered by the FCC, NTSC broadcast 60 half frames per second, which is known as 60 "fields" per second in TV jargon (59.94 fields per second to be exact). NTSC used 525 lines of interlaced resolution (two 262.5-line half frames). The last 21 lines in each half frame were the "vertical blanking interval" (VBI), which gave the electron gun in the CRT time to reposition itself from the bottom of the last frame to the top of the next. See interlace and raster scan.The digital video (DV) camcorder format that is equivalent to NTSC is 720x480 pixels (see DV). The digital TV equivalent is 704x480 pixels (see DTV).NTSC was encoded in the YUV color space, which provides a mathematical equivalent of red, green and blue. It also includes an audio FM frequency and an MTS signal for stereo. See NTSC DVD, YUV, YIQ, 4fSC, vertical blanking interval, aspect ratio, DTV, PAL and SECAM.
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The initial standard (1953) for broadcast television, NTSC was named for the committee that established it in the United States. NTSC is characterized as analog in nature, with 525 interlaced scan lines. There are 640 pixels per line, 485 of which are dedicated to the active picture.The frame rate is 30 fps, 60 fields interlaced, and the aspect ratio is 4:3. As an early analog standard that is viewed by some as overly complex and ineffective in a contemporary digital context, NTSC sometimes is referred to by its detractors in the pejorative as Never The Same Color. NTSC is defined in ITU-R Recommendation 1125 and served as the baseline for subsequent standards, Phase Alternate Line (PAL) and SECAM (S.
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National Television System (or Standards) Committee.
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