Hdtv meaning

High-definition television.
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High-definition television.
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(High Definition TV) HDTV is the high-resolution part of the digital TV standards (see DTV). HDTV may refer to the resolutions or to the TV set, but HD always refers to the resolutions, which were the highest prior to 4K Ultra HD (see 4K TV). See SDTV.Convert Up and DownUsing algorithms to fill in the missing lines, HDTV sets upconvert standard definition (SD) content, such as old movies or DVDs, to the HD resolution the HDTV supports (see table below). HD programs are broadcast in 720p and 1080i, and 720p HDTVs downconvert 1080i broadcasts to 720p. In addition, HDTVs provide numerous zoom and stretch modes to accommodate SD resolutions (see HDTV display modes). See HD formats. For TV types, see flat panel TV, rear-projection TV and front-projection TV. HD - HIGH DEFINITION TV (HDTV) FrameResolution Aspect Rate Pixel Horiz x Vert Ratio (fps) Shape 1. 1920 x 1080 16:9 24p Square 2. 1920 x 1080 16:9 30p Square 3. 1920 x 1080 16:9 30i Square 4. 1280 x 720 16:9 24p Square 5. 1280 x 720 16:9 30pSquare 6. 1280 x 720 16:9 60p Square p = progressive scan i = interlacedHD Ready, Capable, Built In or IntegratedAn "HD Ready" or "HD Capable" TV set means that it can display 720 progressive lines of resolution (720p) at minimum and can scale up lower and scale down higher-resolution signals to fit the screen. HD Ready requires an HD set-top box from the cable or satellite company to receive HD programs."HD Built In" or "integrated HDTV" refers to a TV with a built-in HD tuner for capturing HD broadcasts over the air.HD Has Been Around AwhileSince the turn of the century, consumers have become familiar with high definition TV; however, HD was available years before that. Japan experimented with HD formats in the 1970s and 1980s and was the first to broadcast an 1125-line signal for expensive, large-screen TV sets in the early 1990s. Both Japan and Europe's initial HD formats were analog.For many years in the U.S., various analog and digital HD formats were used to shoot closed circuit presentations for corporate board rooms, trade shows and similar events. See interlace, deinterlace, DTV, letterbox, HD-DVD and aspect ratio.
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A standard for digital television (DTV) that supports display formats that are larger and higher in resolution than either legacy analog TV or digital standard definition television (SDTV). Specifically, HDTV specifies two formats, as detailed in Table H-2. In comparison to analog TV, DTV offers improved reception, without the ghosting, snowy images, and generally poor audio quality. Issues of signal quality in DTV transmission manifest in artifacts such as blocking, or tiling, and stuttering. The ATSC standard specifies MPEG-2 compression, and the transport subsystem as ISO/IEC 13818. Packet transport involves a serial data stream of packets of 188 octets, one octet of which is a synchronization byte and 187 octets of which are payload.This packet approach is suitable for ATM switching, as each 188-octet MPEG-2 packet maps into the payload of four ATM cells, with only 4 octets of padding required. SDTV employs Reed-Solomon forward error correction (FEC) and 8level vestigial sideband (8 VSB) RF modulation to support a bit rate of 19.28 Mbps over a 6 MHz terrestrial broadcast channel. Audio compression is based on the AC-3 specification from Dolby Digital and the ATSC. SDTV standards were developed by the Grand Alliance and reviewed, tested, and documented by the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC) at the request of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC). See also 8-VSB, AC-3, analog, artifact, aspect ratio, ATM, ATSC, broadcast, byte, channel, compression, digital, DTV, FCC, FEC, fps, ghosting, Grand Alliance, interlaced scanning, modulation, MPEG-2, NTSC, octet, packet, padding, PAL, payload, pixel, progressive scanning, Reed-Solomon, refresh rate, resolution, RF, scanning, SDTV, SECAM, and synchronize.
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High-definition television.
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