Ming meaning

mĭng
(now rare) To mix, blend, mingle.
verb
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Chin. dynasty (1368-1644): period noted for scholarly achievements & artistic works, esp. porcelains.
noun
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(UK, dialectal) To produce through mixing; especially, to knead.
verb
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(UK, slang) To be foul smelling.
verb
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The pottery of the era, famed for its high quality.
pronoun
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A Chinese dynasty (1368–1644) noted for its flourishing foreign trade, achievements in scholarship, and development of the arts, especially in porcelain, textiles, and painting.
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noun
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(intransitive) To speak; tell; talk; discourse.
verb
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A former dynasty in China, reigning from the end of the Yuan to the beginning of the Qing.
pronoun
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The era of Chinese history during which the dynasty reigned.
pronoun
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pronoun
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A male or female given name.
pronoun
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(UK, slang) To be unattractive (person or object).
verb
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To speak of; mention; tell; relate.
verb
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A former empire in China, occupying the eastern half of modern China, as well as parts of Russia and northern Vietnam.
pronoun
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Origin of ming

  • Mandarin Míng from mīng bright from Middle Chinese miajŋ

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English mingen, mengen, from Old English mengan (“to mix, combine, unite, associate with, consort, cohabit with, disturb, converse"), from Proto-Germanic *mangijanÄ… (“to mix, knead"), from Proto-Indo-European *menk- (“to rumple, knead"). Cognate with Dutch mengen (“to mix, blend, mingle"), German mengen (“to mix"), Danish mænge (“to rub"), Old English Ä¡emang (“mixture, union, troop, crowd, multitude, congregation, assembly, business, cohabitation"). More at among.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English mingen, mengen, mungen, muneȝen, from Old English myngian, mynegian, Ä¡emynegian (“to bring to mind, have in mind"), from myne (“mind"), from Ä¡emunan (“to remember"), from Proto-Germanic *munanÄ… (“to think"), from Proto-Indo-European *men- (“to think"). Merged in Middle English with Old English Ä¡emyndgian (“to remember, be mindful, remind, intend, commemorate, mention, exhort, impel, warn, demand payment"). More at mind.

    From Wiktionary

  • Backformation from minging.

    From Wiktionary