Midwife definition

mĭdwīf
A person, usually a woman, who is trained to assist women in childbirth.
noun
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One who assists in or takes a part in bringing about a result.
noun
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To assist in bringing forth or about.
verb
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To assist in the birth of (a baby).
verb
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A person (now, esp., a specially trained nurse) whose work is assisting women in childbirth.
noun
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To assist as a midwife in the birth of (a child)
verb
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To help bring about or bring into being.

To midwife a resolution to a conflict.

verb
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A person, usually a woman, who is trained to assist women in childbirth, but who is not a physician.

A hundred years ago, a midwife would bring the baby into the world - going to a hospital to deliver a baby was either impossible or unheard of.

noun
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(rare, figuratively) Someone who assists in bringing about some result or project.
noun
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To act as a midwife.
verb
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(figuratively) To facilitate the emergence of.

But the bigger objective was to help Iraqis midwife a democratic model that could inspire reform across the Arab-Muslim world and give the youth there a chance at a better future.Thomas L. Friedman. "Attention: Baby on Board." New York Times. April 13, 2010.

verb
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
midwife
Plural:
midwives

Origin of midwife

  • Middle English midwif probably mid with (from Old English me-2 in Indo-European roots) wif woman (from Old English wīf wife)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English, corresponding to mid (“with") + wÄ«f (“woman").

    From Wiktionary