Methyl meaning

mĕthəl
The radical CH3 , derived from methane.
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Relating to or being the simplest hydrocarbon unit, CH3 , that can occur as a substituent in an organic compound or as an ion or radical.
adjective
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The monovalent hydrocarbon radical CH3, normally existing only in combination, as in methanol.
noun
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(organic chemistry) The univalent hydrocarbon radical, CH3, formally derived from methane by the loss of a hydrogen atom; a compound or part of a compound formed by the attachment of such a radical.
noun
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(organic chemistry) Used to form terms describing the attachment of a methyl group.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
methyl
Plural:
methyls

Origin of methyl

  • French méthyle back-formation from méthylène methylene methylene

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • French chemists Jean-Baptiste Dumas and Eugene Peligot, after determining methanol's chemical structure, introduced "methylene" from the Ancient Greek μέθυ (methy, “wine") + ὕλη (hulÄ“, “wood (patch of trees)") with the intention of highlighting its origins, "alcohol made from wood (substance)", but with Greek language errors: the Greek for "wood (substance)" is xylo- (Ancient Greek ξύλον (ksulon, “wood")). The term "methyl" was derived in about 1840 by back-formation from "methylene", and was then applied to describe "methyl alcohol".

    From Wiktionary

  • From the German Methyl; compare the French méthyle.

    From Wiktionary