Alcohol meaning

ăl'kə-hôl', -hŏl'
The definition of alcohol is a liquor that contains ethanol and has the potential to intoxicate drinkers, and it can be burned as fuel.

Whiskey, vodka, rum and gin are each an example of alcohol.

noun
5
1
Any of a series of hydroxyl compounds, the simplest of which are derived from saturated hydrocarbons, have the general formula Cn H2n+1 OH, and include ethanol and methanol.
noun
3
1
A colorless volatile flammable liquid, C2 H5 OH, synthesized or obtained by fermentation of sugars and starches and widely used, either pure or denatured, as a solvent and in drugs, cleaning solutions, explosives, and intoxicating beverages.
noun
2
2
A colorless volatile flammable liquid, C2 H5 OH, synthesized or obtained by fermentation of sugars and starches and widely used, either pure or denatured, as a solvent and in drugs, cleaning solutions, explosives, and intoxicating beverages.
noun
0
1
Intoxicating beverages containing ethanol considered as a group.

The national consumption of alcohol.

noun
0
1
Advertisement
A colorless, volatile, pungent liquid, C2H5OH: it can be burned as fuel (10-15% of gasohol), is used in industry and medicine, and is the intoxicating element of whiskey, wine, beer, and other fermented or distilled liquors: classed as a depressant drug.
noun
0
1
Any intoxicating liquor with this liquid in it.
noun
0
1
The drinking of such liquors.

Alcohol was his downfall.

noun
0
1
A class of organic compounds, including ethyl or methyl (wood) alcohol, that contain one or more hydroxyl groups (OH) and form esters in reactions with acids.
noun
0
1
Any of a series of hydroxyl compounds, the simplest of which are derived from saturated hydrocarbons, have the general formula Cn H2n+1 OH, and include ethanol and methanol.
noun
0
1
Advertisement
Intoxicating beverages containing ethanol considered as a group.

The national consumption of alcohol.

noun
0
1
Any of a large number of colorless, flammable organic compounds that contain the hydroxyl group (OH) and that form esters with acids. Alcohols are used as solvents and for manufacturing dyes, perfumes, and pharmaceuticals. Simple alcohols, such as methanol and ethanol, are water-soluble liquids, while more complex ones, like cetyl alcohol, are waxy solids. Names of alcohols usually end in –ol.
0
1
Ethanol.
0
1
(organic chemistry, countable) Any of a class of organic compounds (such as ethanol) containing a hydroxyl functional group (-OH).
noun
0
1
(uncountable) An intoxicating beverage made by the fermentation of sugar or sugar-containing material.
noun
0
1
Advertisement

Origin of alcohol

  • Medieval Latin fine metallic powder, especially of antimony from Arabic al-kuḥl al- the kuḥl powder of antimony kx̣l in Semitic roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Bartholomew Traheron in his 1543 translation of John of Vigo introduces the word as a term used by "barbarous" (Moorish) authors for "fine powder": the barbarous auctours use alcohol, or (as I fynde it sometymes wryten) alcofoll, for moost fine poudre.
    From Wiktionary
  • William Johnson in his 1657 Lexicon Chymicum glosses the word as antimonium sive stibium. By extension, the word came to refer to any fluid obtained by distillation, including "alcohol of wine", the distilled essence of wine.
    From Wiktionary
  • Johnson (1657) glosses alcohol vini as quando omnis superfluitas vini a vino separatur, ita ut accensum ardeat donec totum consumatur, nihilque fæcum aut phlegmatis in fundo remaneat.
    From Wiktionary
  • Libavius in Alchymia (1594) has vini alcohol vel vinum alcalisatum.
    From Wiktionary