Medley meaning

mĕdlē
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Medley is defined as a race within a swim competition where the swimmer does four different styles of swimming in equal distances.

An example of a medley is the 2004 Summer Olympics event for which Michael Phelps won the gold metal in both the 200 and 400 meter individual events.

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The definition of a medley is a combination of things, or a number of songs or tunes combined to create one piece.

An example of a medley is a fruit bowl with oranges, bananas, limes and kiwi fruit.

An example of a medley is a song stringing together the choruses from Madonna's top ten hits.

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An often jumbled assortment; a mixture.
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(music) An arrangement made from a series of melodies, often from various sources.
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(sports) An event in competitive swimming in which backstroke, breaststroke, butterfly, and freestyle are swum in equal distances by an individual or as divisions of a relay race.
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A mixture of things not usually placed together; heterogeneous collection; hodgepodge.
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A musical piece made up of tunes or passages from various works.
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(archaic) Made up of heterogeneous parts.
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Of or having to do with a medley race.
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(now rare, archaic) Combat, fighting; a battle. [from 14th c.]

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A collection or mixture of miscellaneous things. [from 17th c.]

A fruit medley.

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(music) A collection of related songs played or mixed together as a single piece. [from 17th c.]

They played a medley of favorite folk songs as an encore.

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(swimming) A competitive swimming event that combines the four strokes of butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke, and freestyle. [from 20th c.]
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A cloth of mixed colours.

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(music) To combine, to form a medley.
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Origin of medley

  • Middle English medlee from Anglo-Norman medlee meddling from past participle of medler to meddle meddle

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English medle, from Anglo-Norman medlee, Old French medlee, from Late Latin misculata, feminine past participle of misculare (“to mix"). Compare meddle, also melee.

    From Wiktionary