Mammoth meaning

măməth
Frequency:
Of enormous size, extent, or amount; huge.
adjective
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Any of a genus (Mammuthus) of extinct elephants with a hairy skin and long tusks curving upward: remains have been found in North America, Europe, and Asia.
noun
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Mammoth is defined as something huge.

When you make a really, really big mistake, this is an example of a mistake that would be described as a mammoth mistake.

adjective
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Something that is of great size.
noun
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Very big; huge; enormous.
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Of great scope or importance.

Mammoth expectations.

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Any of various extinct elephants of the genus Mammuthus, having long, upwardly curving tusks and thick hair. Mammoths grew to great size and lived throughout the Northern Hemisphere during the Ice Age.
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Any species of the extinct genus Mammuthus, of large, usually hairy, elephant-like mammals with long curved tusks and an inclined back, which became extinct with the last retreat of ice age glaciers during the late Pleistocene period, and are known from fossils, frozen carcasses, and Paleolithic cave paintings found in North America and Eurasia.
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(figuratively) Something very large of its kind.
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Comparable to a mammoth in its size; very large, huge, gigantic.
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The definition of a mammoth is an extinct elephant from the Pleistocene epoch that had curved tusks and a sloping back.

A large extinct furry elephant type animal is an example of a wooly mammoth.

noun
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Any of various extinct elephants of the genus Mammuthus of the Pliocene, Pleistocene, and Holocene Epochs, having ridged molars and often, as in the woolly mammoth, long tusks and hair.
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Origin of mammoth

  • Ultimately (perhaps influenced by behemoth) from Russian mamont, mamot probably from earlier Mansi (Ugric language of western Siberia) mān-oŋt- mān earth (akin to modern Mansi mā- earth) (as in mā-xar mammoth (literally, “earth stag”)) oŋt- horn (in reference to fossil mammoth tusks)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From obsolete Russian мамант (mamant) (modern мамонт (mamont)), probably from an Uralic language, like Old Vogul *mÄ“moÅ‹t "˜earth-horn' (compare Mansi mā "˜earth', ou̯tÉ™ "˜horn').

    From Wiktionary